424b3 - Pear Therapeutics, Inc. 10-Q 2022 Q3
Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3)
Registration No. 333-261876

Prospectus Supplement No. 6
(To Prospectus dated March 29, 2022)
 
https://cdn.kscope.io/af9f9c36cee0745edcfa94ed1fc5ad15-image_0a.jpg
PEAR THERAPEUTICS, INC.

95,711,409 Shares of Class A Common Stock
5,013,333 Warrants to Purchase Shares of Class A Common Stock

This prospectus supplement no. 6 (this “Prospectus Supplement”) amends and supplements the prospectus dated March 29, 2022 (as supplemented or amended from time to time, the “Prospectus”) which forms a part of our Registration Statement on Form S-1 (Registration Statement No. 333-261876). This Prospectus Supplement is being filed to update and supplement the information included or incorporated by reference in the Prospectus with the information contained in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on November 14, 2022 (the “Form 10-Q”). Accordingly, we have attached the Form 10-Q to this Prospectus Supplement.
This Prospectus Supplement updates and supplements the information in the Prospectus and is not complete without, and may not be delivered or utilized except in combination with, the Prospectus, including any amendments or supplements thereto. This Prospectus Supplement should be read in conjunction with the Prospectus and if there is any inconsistency between the information in the Prospectus and this Prospectus Supplement, you should rely on the information in this Prospectus Supplement.
Our Class A Common Stock is listed on The Nasdaq Capital Market (“Nasdaq”) under the symbol “PEAR” and the Public Warrants are listed on Nasdaq under the symbol “PEARW”. On November 10, 2022, the last quoted sale price for the Pear Class A Common Shares as reported on Nasdaq was $2.91 per share and the last quoted sale price for our Public Warrants as reported on Nasdaq was $0.16 per warrant.

Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. Before buying any securities, you should carefully read the discussion of the risks of investing in our securities in “Risk Factors” beginning on page 12 of the Prospectus.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of the securities to be issued under the Prospectus or determined if the Prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
The date of this prospectus supplement is November 14, 2022.




 

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2022
or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ______ to_______
Commission File Number: 001-39969
https://cdn.kscope.io/af9f9c36cee0745edcfa94ed1fc5ad15-logo-pearxtherapeuticsxfin.jpg
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware85-4103092
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
200 State Street, 13th Floor
Boston, MA
02109
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (617) 925-7848
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each ClassTrading Symbol(s)Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Class A common stock,
par value $0.0001 per share
PEARThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Warrants, each exercisable for one share of Class A common stock for $11.50 per sharePEARWThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports); and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filerAccelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting company
  Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐ No ☒

The number of shares of the registrant’s Class A common stock outstanding as of November 10, 2022 was 139,543,104.
 


Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
Form 10-Q
For the Quarter Ended September 30, 2022


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
PART I
PART II
References throughout this Form 10-Q to “we,” “us,” the “Company,” “Pear” or “our company” are to Pear Therapeutics, Inc. and it’s consolidated subsidiaries, and “Legacy Pear” refers to Pear Therapeutics (US), Inc. and it’s consolidated subsidiary prior to the Business Combination on December 3, 2021, unless otherwise noted or the context otherwise indicates.
This document contains references to trademarks, trade names, and service marks belonging to other entities. Solely for convenience, trademarks, trade names, and service marks referred to in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q may appear without the ® or TM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that the applicable licensor will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, its rights to these trademarks and trade names. We do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trade names, trademarks, or service marks to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, any other company.

Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 1

Table of Contents
PART I: FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
September 30,
2022
December 31, 2021
Assets
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents
$59,685 $169,567 
Short-term investments
23,934 5,004 
Restricted cash - short-term74 — 
Accounts receivable
7,183 1,794 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
7,992 8,876 
Total current assets
98,868 185,241 
Property and equipment, net
6,481 6,255 
Right-of-use assets (Note 8)9,329 — 
Restricted cash - long-term
411 411 
Other long-term assets
4,646 5,253 
Total assets
$119,735 $197,160 
Liabilities and stockholders’ equity
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable
$1,124 $1,806 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities
17,204 17,946 
Lease liabilities - current (Note 8)
1,890 — 
Deferred revenues
482 421 
Debt
27,455 26,993 
Total current liabilities
48,155 47,166 
Lease liabilities - noncurrent (Note 8)8,718 — 
Embedded debt derivative
— 675 
Warrant liabilities
2,413 8,528 
Earn-out liabilities
7,402 48,363 
Other long-term liabilities
801 1,994 
Total liabilities
67,489 106,726 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 9)
Stockholders’ equity:
Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized as of September 30, 2022; and no shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021
— — 
Common stock, $0.0001 par value; 690,000,000 authorized as of September 30, 2022; and 139,248,512 and 137,836,028 shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively
14 14 
Additional paid-in capital
349,447 338,404 
Accumulated deficit
(297,103)(247,983)
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income
(112)(1)
Total stockholders’ equity
52,246 90,434 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
$119,735 $197,160 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 2

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts) 2022202120222021
Revenue
Product revenue
$3,528 $1,203 $9,274 $2,550 
Collaboration and license revenue
555 108 855 338 
Total revenue
4,083 1,311 10,129 2,888 
Cost and operating expenses
Cost of product revenue
2,555 2,120 6,437 3,585 
Research and development
10,390 9,576 36,370 24,943 
Selling, general, and administrative
17,767 17,966 61,512 45,811 
Total cost and operating expenses
30,712 29,662 104,319 74,339 
Loss from operations
(26,629)(28,351)(94,190)(71,451)
Other income (expense):
Interest and other (expense) income, net
(647)(1,042)(2,006)(3,086)
Change in estimated fair value of earn-out liabilities(2,829)— 40,961 — 
Change in estimated fair value of warrant liabilities
(618)(1,905)6,115 (7,302)
Loss on issuance of Legacy Pear convertible preferred stock
— — — (2,053)
Total other income (expense)
(4,094)(2,947)45,070 (12,441)
Net loss
$(30,723)$(31,298)$(49,120)$(83,892)
Unrealized gain (loss) on short-term investments
$$(1)$(111)$— 
Comprehensive loss
$(30,715)$(31,299)$(49,231)$(83,892)
Net loss per share:
Basic and Diluted
$(0.22)$(0.28)$(0.35)$(0.76)
Weighted average common shares outstanding:
Basic and Diluted
138,956,879 112,236,267 138,369,788 110,960,112 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 3

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Common Stock
Additional
Paid-In Capital
Accumulated Deficit
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Total Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)
(dollars in thousands)
Shares
Amount
Balance at January 1, 2021
106,721,878 11 $269,946 $(182,841)$— $87,116 
Issuance of Legacy Pear Series D convertible preferred stock, net of issuance costs of $83
4,503,618 — 21,970 — — 21,970 
Exercise of common stock options
642,489 — 402 — — 402 
Stock-based compensation expense
— — 463 — — 463 
Net loss
— — — (24,393)— (24,393)
Balance at March 31, 2021111,867,985 $11 $292,781 $(207,234)$ $85,558 
Exercise of common stock options
285,198 — 267 — — 267 
Stock-based compensation expense
— — 572 — — 572 
Other comprehensive income
— — — — 
Net loss
— — — (28,201)— (28,201)
Balance at June 30, 2021112,153,183 $11 $293,620 $(235,435)$1 $58,197 
Exercise of common stock options
149,492 — 134 — — 134 
Stock-based compensation expense
— — 930 — — 930 
Other comprehensive loss
— — — — (1)(1)
Net loss
— — — (31,298)— (31,298)
Balance at September 30, 2021112,302,675 $11 $294,684 $(266,733)$ $27,962 
 
Common Stock
Additional
Paid-In Capital
Accumulated Deficit
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Total Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)
 
Shares
Amount
Balance at January 1, 2022
137,836,028 $14 $338,404 $(247,983)$(1)$90,434 
Exercise of common stock options
65,145 — 75 — — 75 
Stock-based compensation expense
— — 2,901 — — 2,901 
Exercise of common stock warrants10 — — — — — 
Other comprehensive loss
— — — — (42)(42)
Net loss
— — — (23,859)— (23,859)
Balance at March 31, 2022137,901,183 $14 $341,380 $(271,842)$(43)$69,509 
Exercise of common stock options
776,587 — 760 — — 760 
Stock-based compensation expense
— — 3,386 — — 3,386 
Other comprehensive loss
— — — — (77)(77)
Net income
— — — 5,462 — 5,462 
Balance at June 30, 2022138,677,770 $14 $345,526 $(266,380)$(120)$79,040 
Exercise of common stock options
570,742 $— $358 $— $— $358 
Stock-based compensation expense
— $— $3,563 $— $— $3,563 
Other comprehensive income
— $— $— $— $$
Net loss
— $— $— $(30,723)$— $(30,723)
Balance at September 30, 2022139,248,512 $14 $349,447 $(297,103)$(112)$52,246 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 4

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Nine Months Ended September 30,
(dollars in thousands) 20222021
Operating Activities:
  
Net loss
$(49,120)$(83,892)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:
Depreciation expense
2,419 1,032 
Amortization of intangible asset
465 475 
Amortization of debt discount
461 475 
Amortization of right-of-use asset1,285 — 
Accretion and amortization of interest income
(53)17 
Stock-based compensation expense    
9,850 1,965 
Loss on issuance of Legacy Pear convertible preferred stock
— 2,053 
Change in fair value of warrants
(6,115)7,302 
Change in fair value of earn-out liabilities(40,961)— 
Change in fair value of embedded derivative(675)— 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Accounts receivable
(5,390)(65)
Prepaid expenses and other assets
1,025 (1,296)
Lease liabilities
(1,252)— 
Accounts payable
(927)(2,227)
Accrued expenses, other liabilities and non-current liabilities
(689)4,849 
Deferred revenues
62 113 
Net cash used in operating activities
(89,615)(69,199)
Investing Activities:
Proceeds from maturities of short-term investments
47,048 15,025 
Purchases of short-term investments
(66,035)(8,014)
Purchases of property and equipment
(2,400)(2,375)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
(21,387)4,636 
Financing Activities:
Proceeds from issuance of Legacy Pear convertible preferred stock, net
— 19,918 
Payment of deferred offering costs
— (4,620)
Proceeds from exercise of stock options
1,194 803 
Net cash provided by financing activities
1,194 16,101 
Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash
(109,808)(48,462)
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash—beginning of period
169,978 112,061 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash—end of period
$60,170 $63,599 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
Cash paid for interest
$2,825 $2,730 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing information:
Deferred offering and equity issuance costs included in accounts payable and accrued expenses    
$— $2,296 
Purchases of property and equipment in accounts payable and accrued expenses
$143 $491 
Payment of milestone license in intangibles and accrued expenses$— $1,000 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 5

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
1. NATURE OF BUSINESS
Basis of Presentation
References throughout this Form 10-Q to “we,” “us,” the “Company,” “Pear” or “our company” are to Pear Therapeutics, Inc. (formerly known as Thimble Point Acquisition Corp.) and its subsidiaries, and “Legacy Pear” refers to Pear Therapeutics (US), Inc. prior to the Business Combination, unless otherwise noted or the context otherwise indicates. References to THMA refer to the Company prior to the consummation of the Business Combination and references to “Legacy Pear” refer to Pear Therapeutics, Inc. (now Pear Therapeutics (US), Inc.) prior to the consummation of the Business Combination.
Legacy Pear is deemed the accounting predecessor and the post-company successor US Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) registrant, which means Legacy Pear financial statements for previous periods are disclosed in this Form 10-Q. Future period reports filed with the SEC will include Pear Therapeutics, Inc. and its subsidiaries.
Organization
Pear is a leader in prescription digital therapeutics, or PDTs. The Company’s PDTs treat diseases with clinically validated software.
On December 3, 2021, (the “Closing Date”), we consummated a business combination, or the “Business Combination”, pursuant to the terms of the business combination agreement, or “Business Combination Agreement”, dated June 21, 2021, by and among the Company (formerly known as Thimble Point Acquisition Corp., or “THMA”), Pear Therapeutics (US), Inc., a Delaware corporation incorporated on August 14, 2013 (“Pear US” or “Legacy Pear”) (formerly known as Pear Therapeutics, Inc.) and Oz Merger Sub, Inc., pursuant to which Oz Merger Sub, Inc. (a Delaware corporation and wholly-owned subsidiary of THMA, or “Merger Sub”) merged with and into Pear US, with Pear US surviving as our wholly owned subsidiary. Upon the closing of the Business Combination, THMA changed its name to Pear Therapeutics, Inc. (“Pear” or the “Company”).

Pursuant to the terms of the Business Combination Agreement, each share of Legacy Pear common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Legacy Pear Common Shares”) issued and outstanding immediately prior to the closing of the Business Combination, after giving effect to the conversion of all issued and outstanding shares of Legacy Pear preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Legacy Pear Preferred Shares”) to Legacy Pear Common Shares, were canceled and converted into the right to receive a number of shares of Class A common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Class A common stock”) equal to the number of shares of Legacy Pear Common Shares multiplied by the exchange ratio of approximately 1.47. In addition, all outstanding equity awards of Legacy Pear were converted into equity awards with the option to purchase Class A common stock with the same terms and conditions adjusted by the exchange ratio of approximately 1.47.
In connection with the Business Combination, THMA completed the sale and issuance of 10,280,000 shares of Class A common stock in a fully committed common stock private placement at a purchase price of $10.00 per share (“PIPE Shares”) for an aggregate purchase price of $102,800 (“PIPE Investment”), and a Forward Purchase Agreement Assignment, dated as of December 2, 2021, by and among THMA, the Anchor Investor, and a PIPE investor (the “Forward Purchase Assignment”); which closed simultaneously with the consummation of the Business Combination. Upon the closing of the Business Combination, all of the remaining outstanding THMA Class A common shares were separated, pursuant to their terms, into one share of Class A common stock (which totaled 832,899 shares Class A common stock, “Public Shares”) and one-third (1/3) of one redeemable warrant (and THMA’s units ceased trading on the Nasdaq). Further, KLP SPAC 1 LLC (the “Anchor Investor”) purchased 6,387,026 shares of Class A common stock at a purchase price of $10.00 per share in connection with the Forward Purchase Agreement, dated as of February 1, 2021, by and between THMA and the Anchor Investor (the “Forward Purchase Agreement”), as amended from time to time, including by the Amendment to Forward Purchase Agreement dated as of June 21, 2021, and the Second Amendment to Forward Purchase Agreement dated as of November 14, 2021 (the “Amended Forward Purchase Agreement”), entered into with THMA on February 1, 2021 (“THMA Sponsor
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 6

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
Shares”). Gross proceeds from the Business Combination totaled approximately $175,001 which included funds held in THMA’s trust account (after giving effect to redemptions). Transaction costs totaled approximately $32,779.
Legacy Pear was deemed the accounting acquirer in the Business Combination. This determination was primarily based on Legacy Pear’s stockholders prior to the Business Combination having a majority of the voting power in the combined company, Legacy Pear having the ability to appoint a majority of the Board of Directors of the combined company, Legacy Pear’s existing management comprising the senior management of the combined company, Legacy Pear comprising the ongoing operations of the combined company, Legacy Pear being the larger entity based on historical revenues and business operations, and the combined company assuming Legacy Pear’s name. Accordingly, for accounting purposes, the Business Combination was treated as the equivalent of Legacy Pear issuing stock for the net assets of THMA, accompanied by a recapitalization. Under this method of accounting, THMA who was the legal acquirer, is treated as the “acquired” company for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, the Business Combination was treated as the equivalent of Pear issuing stock for the net assets of THMA, accompanied by a recapitalization. The net assets of THMA are stated at historical cost, with no goodwill or other intangible assets recorded. The equity structure has been restated in all comparative periods up to the Closing Date to reflect the number of shares of the Company’s Class A common stock, $0.0001 par value per share, issued to Legacy Pear stockholders in connection with the Business Combination. As such, the shares and corresponding capital amounts and earnings per share related to Legacy Pear Preferred Shares and Legacy Pear Common Shares prior to the Business Combination have been retroactively restated as shares reflecting the exchange ratio of approximately 1.47 established in the Business Combination. Legacy Pear Preferred Shares previously classified as mezzanine were retroactively adjusted, converted into Class A common stock, and reclassified to permanent as a result of the reverse recapitalization. See Note 3 for more information.
THMA, now Pear Therapeutics, Inc., a Delaware corporation, was incorporated on December 1, 2020. Pear Therapeutics (US), Inc., previously known as Pear Therapeutics, Inc., is a Delaware corporation incorporated on August 14, 2013. The Company is headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts.
Going Concern
The Company is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties common to early-stage technology-based companies, including, but not limited to, rapid technological changes, protection of its proprietary technology and intellectual property, commercialization of existing and new products, development by competitors of competing products, dependence on key personnel, compliance with government regulations, including compliance with the US Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, and the ability to secure additional capital to fund operations.
The Company obtained FDA marketing authorization for its three products, reSET® (2017), reSET-O® (2018), and Somryst® (2020). In October 2019, after terminating our agreement with Sandoz Inc., our then collaboration partner, we began the direct commercialization of reSET® and reSET-O®.
The Company has incurred recurring losses since inception and anticipates net losses and negative operating cash flows for the near future and may be unable to remain in compliance with certain financial covenants required under its credit facility. For the nine months ended September 30, 2022, the Company had a net loss of $49,120 and as of September 30, 2022, had an accumulated deficit of $297,103. As of September 30, 2022, the Company had $83,619 of cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments. While the Company has recorded revenue, revenues have been insufficient to fund operations. Accordingly, the Company has funded its operations to date through a combination of proceeds raised from equity and debt issuances, including the Business Combination. The Company’s operating costs include the cost of developing and commercializing products as well as providing research services. As a consequence, the Company will need to raise additional equity and debt financing that may not be available, if at all, at terms acceptable to the Company to fund future operations. As a result, the Company could be required to delay, scale back or abandon some or all of its development programs and other operations, which could materially harm the Company’s business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. See note 15 for more information on the restructuring and the reductions in workforce, including the impact on pipeline products. Management believes these uncertainties raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Because of these uncertainties, the accompanying consolidated financial statements
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 7

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. Due to the substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue operating as a going concern for twelve months from the issuance date of these financial statements and the material adverse change clause in the Credit Agreement and Guaranty with Perceptive Credit Holdings III, LP (the “Perceptive Credit Facility”), the amounts due as of September 30, 2022, have been classified as current in the consolidated balance sheet. The lender has not invoked the material adverse change clause as of the date of issuance of these financial statements. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not reflect any other adjustments relating to the recoverability and reclassification of assets and liabilities that might be necessary if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern. The Company is subject to various covenants related to the Perceptive Credit Facility, as defined in Note 7, entered into on June 30, 2020, and given the substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern, there is a risk that it may not meet its covenants in the future. See Note 7 for more information on the Perceptive Credit Facility and related covenants.
COVID-19 Related Significant Risks and Uncertainties
The Company is subject to additional risks and uncertainties due to the ongoing pandemic of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19. Although conditions have improved in the US in recent months, on October 13, 2022, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services extended the COVID-19 public health emergency declaration through at least January 11, 2023.The Company is closely monitoring the continued impact of COVID-19 on all aspects of its business, including how it will impact its customers, patients, employees, suppliers, vendors, and business partners. The Company is unable to predict the specific impact that COVID-19 may have on its business, financial position, and operations moving forward due to the numerous uncertainties. Any estimates made herein may change as new events occur and additional information is obtained, and actual results could differ materially from any estimates made herein under different assumptions or conditions. The Company will continue to assess the evolving impact of COVID-19.
2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with US generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP. Any reference in these notes to applicable guidance is meant to refer to the authoritative GAAP as found in the Accounting Standards Codification, or ASC, and Accounting Standards Update, or ASU, of the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB.
The consolidated financial statements as of September 30, 2022 and 2021, and for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, include the accounts of Pear and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in the consolidated financial statements herein.
Certain monetary amounts, percentages, and other figures included elsewhere in these consolidated financial statements have been subject to rounding adjustments. Accordingly, figures shown as totals in certain tables may not be the arithmetic aggregation of the figures that precede them, and figures expressed as percentages in the text may not total 100% or, as applicable, when aggregated may not be the arithmetic aggregation of the percentages that precede them.
Use of Estimates
The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP, requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting periods. On an ongoing basis, the Company evaluates its estimates. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and various other assumptions that the Company believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 8

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from those estimates and changes in estimates are reflected in reported results in the period in which they become known.
Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash
The Company considers only those highly liquid investments, readily convertible to cash, that mature within 90 days from the date of purchase to be cash equivalents. The Company’s cash equivalents include money market funds, commercial paper, and overnight deposits.
The following table reconciles cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash reported within the Company’s consolidated balance sheets to the total amounts shown in the consolidated statements of cash flows:
Reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash:September 30, 2022December 31, 2021
Cash and cash equivalents
$59,685 $169,567 
Restricted cash - short-term74 — 
Restricted cash - long-term
411 411 
Total cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash
$60,170 $169,978 
Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements
In February 2016, the FASB, issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), as subsequently amended, which provides guidance requiring lessees to recognize a right-of-use asset (“ROU”) and a lease liability on the balance sheet for substantially all leases, with the exception of short-term leases. Leases are classified as either finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the statements of operations.
The Company adopted the leasing standard effective January 1, 2022, using the revised modified retrospective transition method, with comparative periods continuing to be reported under ASC 840 as it was the accounting standard in effect for such period. In the adoption of ASU 2016-02, the Company carried forward the assessment from ASC 840 of whether its contracts contain or are leases, the classification of its leases, and remaining lease terms. The Company did not elect the hindsight practical expedient upon adoption of the new standard.
The most significant impact resulting from the adoption of this new standard was the recognition of ROU assets of $10,614 and operating lease liabilities of $11,860 on the adoption date, January 1, 2022. The difference between the ROU assets and lease liabilities on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet is primarily due to the accrual for lease payments as a result of straight-line lease expense and unamortized tenant incentive liability balances. Existing deferred rent and prepaid rent amounts were removed from the consolidated balance sheets at the date of adoption. The adoption did not have a material impact to the Company's consolidated statements of operations or statement of cash flows.
The Company has made an accounting policy election to keep leases with an initial term of 12 months or less off of the balance sheet and recognize those lease payments in the consolidated statements of income on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The Company has also elected the practical expedient to not separate lease and non-lease components for all of its leases as the non-lease components are not significant to the overall lease costs.
See Note 8 for further information.
In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12, Income Taxes-Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. ASU 2019-12 eliminates certain exceptions related to the approach for intra-period tax allocation, the methodology for calculating income taxes in an interim period and the recognition of deferred tax liabilities for outside basis differences. It also clarifies and simplifies other aspects of the accounting for income taxes. This standard is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2022. The Company’s adoption of the standard effective January 1, 2022, did not have a material impact to its condensed consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 9

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
3. Business Combination
As discussed in Note 1, on December 3, 2021, the Company consummated a business combination pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement. The Business Combination was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in accordance with GAAP. Under this method of accounting, THMA, who was the legal acquirer, was treated as the “acquired” company for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, the Business Combination was treated as the equivalent of Pear issuing stock for the net assets of THMA, accompanied by a recapitalization.
Upon the closing of the Business Combination, holders of Legacy Pear Common Shares received shares of Class A common stock in an amount determined by application of the exchange ratio of approximately 1.47 (the “Exchange Ratio”), which was based on Legacy Pear’s implied price per share prior to the Business Combination. For periods prior to the Business Combination, the reported share and per share amounts have been retroactively converted (“Retroactive Conversion”) by applying the Exchange Ratio. The consolidated assets, liabilities and results of operations prior to the Business Combination are those of Legacy Pear.
In addition, holders of Legacy Pear Common Shares (and Legacy Pear Preferred Shares who converted their shares into Legacy Pear Common Shares in connection with the Merger) received the contingent right to receive up to 12,395,625 additional shares of Class A common stock (the “Earn-Out Shares”) upon the achievement of certain earn-out targets. The holders of Legacy Pear Common Shares are eligible to receive up to 12,395,625 shares in the aggregate of additional shares of Class A common stock in three equal tranches of 4,131,875 shares respectively, upon the Company achieving $12.50, $15.00, or $17.50, respectively, as its volume-weighted average price per share for any 20 trading days within a 30 consecutive trading day period (as adjusted for share splits, reverse share splits, share dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations, reclassifications, combination, exchange of shares, or the like) during the period ending on December 3, 2026.
Further, the Company assumed the outstanding warrants to purchase 9,199,944 shares of the Company’s Class A common stock at $11.50 per share (the “Public Warrants”) and the outstanding warrants (the “Private Placement Warrants”) held by LJ10 LLC, (the “Sponsor”) to purchase 5,013,333 shares of the Company’s Class A common stock at $11.50 per share. The Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants expire five years after the completion of the Business Combination.
In connection with the Business Combination, the Company incurred approximately $32,779 of equity issuance costs, consisting of underwriting, legal, and other professional fees, $31,400 of which were recorded to additional paid-in capital as a reduction of proceeds and $1,379 of which was recorded as an expense in selling, general, and administrative expenses on the consolidated statement of comprehensive income.
See Note 7 for information on the Legacy Pear warrants that were exercised prior to the Business Combination.
The number of shares of common stock outstanding immediately following the consummation of the business combination was as follows:
Class A
Common Stock
THMA Public Shares832,899 
THMA Initial Stockholders6,900,000 
Shares Issued pursuant to Forward Purchase Agreement to Anchor Investor
6,387,026 
Shares Issued to PIPE Investors and Forward Purchase Assignment10,280,000 
Legacy Pear Equityholders (1)
113,399,293 
Total shares of common stock immediately after business combination137,799,218 
(1)     The number of Legacy Pear shares was determined from the shares of Legacy Pear shares outstanding immediately prior to the closing of the Business Combination converted at the Exchange Ratio of approximately 1.47. All fractional shares were rounded down.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 10

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants
As of the Closing Date, the total value of the liability associated with the Public and Private Placement Warrants was $16,487 measured at fair value based on the public warrant quoted price. The Company concluded the warrants met the definition of a liability and have been classified as such on the balance sheet. The fair value of the warrant liability was $2,413 and $8,528 at September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively. See Notes 4 and 11 for further information on the Public and Private Placement Warrants.         
Earn-Out Liabilities
The Company accounts for the potential issuance of the Earn-Out Shares as a contingent consideration arrangement, a liability for which was initially valued and recorded at $95,401, which was estimated by using a Monte Carlo Simulation Method (“MCSM”) for each earn out period. Key inputs and assumptions used in this were the Company’s stock price, expected term, volatility, the risk-free rate, and dividend yield. Certain of these inputs are Level 3 assumptions that are updated each reporting period as the earn-out liabilities are recorded at fair value at each reporting date. The Company revalued the earn-out liabilities as of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, and determined the fair value to be $7,402 and $48,363, respectively. The change in the fair value of the earn-out liabilities were recorded in other income (expense) on the statement of operations.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 11

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
4. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
The tables below present certain of our assets and liabilities measured at fair value categorized by the level of input used in the valuation of each asset and liability.
September 30, 2022
Description
Total Fair Value
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Cash equivalents:
   
Money market funds
$41,185 $41,185 $— $— 
U.S. Treasury Bills3,376 3,376 — — 
Total cash equivalents
44,561 44,561 — — 
Debt investments:
U.S. Treasury Bills5,982 5,982 — — 
Corporate bonds
6,958 — 6,958 — 
Commercial paper
10,994 — 10,994 — 
Total debt investments
23,934 5,982 17,952 — 
Total assets
$68,495 $50,543 $17,952 $— 
Long-term liabilities:
Warrant liabilities
2,413 1,562 851 — 
Earn-out liabilities
7,402 — — 7,402 
Total liabilities
$9,815 $1,562 $851 $7,402 
December 31, 2021
Description
Total Fair Value
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Cash equivalents:
Money market funds
$129,184 $129,184 $— $— 
Debt investments:
Corporate bonds
1,007 — 1,007 — 
Commercial paper
3,998 — 3,998 — 
Total debt investments
5,005 — 5,005 — 
Total assets
$134,189 $129,184 $5,005 $— 
Long-term liabilities:
Embedded debt derivative
$675 $— $— $675 
Warrant liabilities
8,528 5,520 3,008 
Earn-out liabilities
48,363 — — 48,363 
Total liabilities
$57,566 $5,520 $3,008 $49,038 
The Company evaluates transfers between levels at the end of each reporting period. There were no transfers of financial instruments between levels during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021.
Cash equivalents—Money market funds and U.S. Treasury Bills included within cash equivalents are classified within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy because they are valued using quoted market prices in active markets.
Investments—The Company measures its investments at fair value on a recurring basis and classifies those instruments within Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. US Treasury Bills are classified within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy because pricing is based on quoted market prices for identical instruments in active markets of the reporting date. Marketable securities, including corporate bonds and commercial paper, are classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy because pricing inputs are other than quoted prices in active markets, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date, and fair value is determined
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 12

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
using models or other valuation methodologies. The Company recorded an unrealized gain of $8 and an unrealized loss of $1 for the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, and an unrealized loss of $111 and no unrealized gain for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, in other comprehensive income (loss) on short-term investments.
Embedded debt derivative — As described in Note 7, the Company concluded that the contingent put options contained in the Perceptive Credit Facility that could require mandatory repayment upon the occurrence of an event of default, change of control and certain other events represent an embedded derivative required to be bifurcated from the debt host instrument. The embedded debt derivative is measured at fair value using a probability-weighted cash flow valuation methodology. The change in estimated fair value of the embedded derivative resulted in a gain of $675 for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, which is recorded in Interest and other (expense) income in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive income (loss). The determination of the fair value of an embedded debt derivative includes inputs not observable in the market and as such, represents a Level 3 measurement. The methodology utilized requires inputs based on certain subjective assumptions, specifically, probabilities of mandatory debt repayment prior to maturity ranging between 0 -10%.
Warrant liabilities — As a result of the Business Combination on December 3, 2021, the Company recorded a liability for Public and Private Placement Warrants to purchase Class A common stock in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. See Note 3 for further information. The Public Warrants are traded on Nasdaq and are recorded at fair value using the closing stock price as of the measurement date. The Private Placement Warrants, which have a single holder, have similar terms and are subject to substantially the same redemption features as the Public Warrants. Accordingly, the most advantageous market for the Private Placement Warrants is determined from the perspective of the holder of such warrants as an asset. Since any transfer to a non-permitted transferee (i.e., to a market participant) would cause the Private Placement Warrants to become Public Warrants, the fair value of the Private Placement Warrants is based on the quoted price of the Public Warrants.
As of the Closing Date, the total value of the liability associated with the Public and Private Placement Warrants was $16,487 measured at fair value based on the Public Warrant quoted price on Nasdaq (Ticker: PEARW). The Company concluded that the warrants met the definition of a liability and have been classified as such on the balance sheet. At September 30, 2022, the fair value of the warrant liability was $2,413.
Earn-out liabilities — Upon the closing of the Business Combination, the Earn-Out Shares were accounted for as a liability because the triggering events that determine the number of shares to be earned included events that were indexed to the common stock of the Company, with the change fair value recognized in Change in the estimated fair value of earn-out liabilities in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive income (loss).
The estimated fair value of the Earn-out Shares was determined using a MCSM using the following assumptions at each valuation date:
September 30, 2022December 31, 2021
Stock price$2.04$6.20
Risk-free interest rate4.10%1.25%
Expected term (in years)4.184.92
Expected volatility64.10%55.00%
Dividend yield—%—%
Refer to Note 3 for more information on the triggering events of the Earn-Out Shares. The change in fair value of the earn-out liabilities resulted in other income of $40,961 recognized in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive income (loss) for the nine months ended September 30, 2022.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 13

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
The following table reconciles the change in the fair value of the earn-out liabilities valued using Level 3 inputs:
Earn-Out Liabilities
Fair value as of December 31, 2021
$48,363 
Change in fair value
(40,961)
Fair value as of September 30, 2022
$7,402 
5. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT
Property and equipment, net consists of the following:
September 30, 2022December 31, 2021
Internal-use software
$9,091 $6,591 
Equipment
692 579 
Construction in process
— 362 
Furniture and fixtures
711 586 
Leasehold improvements
779 509 
Total property and equipment
11,273 8,627 
Less: accumulated depreciation
(4,792)(2,372)
Property and equipment, net
$6,481 $6,255 
Depreciation expense was $879 and $2,419 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, respectively, and $447 and $1,032 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively.
6. ACCRUED EXPENSES AND OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities consist of the following:
September 30, 2022December 31, 2021
Compensation and related benefits
$11,869 $11,855 
Commercial and marketing related costs882 1,821 
Professional services
1,442 1,710 
Research and development costs
1,682 781 
Other
1,329 1,779 
Total
$17,204 $17,946 
7. INDEBTEDNESS
Perceptive Credit Facility
On June 30, 2020, the Perceptive Close Date, the Company entered into the Perceptive Credit Facility, with Perceptive Credit Holdings III, LP, as administrative agent and lender with a syndicate of other lenders, collectively Perceptive. The Perceptive Credit Facility, as amended, consists of a secured term loan facility in an aggregate amount of up to $50,000, which will be made available under the following three tranches: (i) Tranche 1 - $30,000, available at the Perceptive Closing Date; (ii) Tranche 2 - $10,000, available no later than December 31, 2021; and (iii) Tranche 3 - $10,000, available no later than December 31, 2021. The Company did not draw down on the available borrowings under Tranche 2 or Tranche 3.

Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 14

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
The Perceptive Credit Facility bears interest through maturity at a variable rate based upon the one-month LIBOR rate plus 11.0%, subject to a LIBOR floor of 1.0%. As of September 30, 2022, the interest rate was 13.6%. When the LIBOR interest rate is discontinued in the future, it is expected that the interest rate of the Perceptive Credit Facility would switch to an alternative benchmark rate, primarily Secured Overnight Financing Rate, or SOFR. As of September 30, 2022, the effect of switching from LIBOR to SOFR would not have been material to the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.The Company is required to make interest-only payments until May 31, 2024, after which point the Company will be required to make monthly payments of principal equal to 3.0% of the then outstanding principal until maturity on June 30, 2025, or the Maturity Date. If the Company prepays the loan prior to the Maturity Date, it will be required to pay a prepayment fee guaranteeing Perceptive a 1.5 times return on any prepaid amount. A change of control, which includes a new entity or group owning more than 35.0% of the Company’s voting stock, or prior to an IPO, the failure of the existing holders to own at least 35.0% of the Company’s voting stock, trigger a mandatory prepayment of the term loan. The Business Combination did not trigger this clause as existing holders retained greater than 35% of the combined Company’s voting stock. The Company paid issuance costs of $750 in connection with its entry into the Perceptive Credit Facility.
The Company concluded the contingent put options that could require mandatory repayment upon the occurrence of an event of default, change of control and certain other events represent an embedded derivative required to be bifurcated from the debt host instrument and accounted for separately and recorded an embedded debt derivative of $675 as of December 31, 2021. There was no balance at September 30, 2022. Any changes to the derivative liability in future periods will be recognized as interest and other (expense) income, net in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.
The Perceptive Credit Facility is secured by substantially all the assets of the Company, including our intellectual property. The Perceptive Credit Facility requires the Company to (i) maintain a minimum aggregate cash balance of $5,000 in one or more controlled accounts, and (ii) as of the last day of each fiscal quarter commencing with the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2022, report revenues for the trailing 12-month period that exceed the amounts set forth in the Perceptive Credit Facility which range from $5,750 for the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2022, to $125,000 for the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2025. For the quarter ending December 31, 2022, the trailing 12-month period revenue requirement is $18,000. The Perceptive Credit Facility contains various affirmative and negative covenants that limit the Company’s ability to engage in specified types of transactions. The Company was in compliance with the covenants under the Perceptive Credit Facility as of September 30, 2022.
On the Perceptive Closing Date, Perceptive received a warrant certificate exercisable into 775,000 shares of Legacy Pear Series C preferred stock, and had the Company borrowed under Tranche 2 or Tranche 3, the Company would have been obligated to issue two additional warrants, the Additional Warrants, to Perceptive each to purchase up to 50,000 shares of Legacy Pear Series C preferred stock. In the event the Company issued Legacy Pear Series D preferred stock, Perceptive had the right to convert the Legacy Pear Series C preferred stock warrant into a warrant to purchase Legacy Pear Series D preferred stock, and the exercise price shall be automatically adjusted to equal the original per share price for Legacy Pear Series D preferred stock. On the Perceptive Closing Date, the Company issued freestanding Legacy Pear Series C preferred stock warrants to Perceptive, which were converted to Legacy Pear Series D preferred stock warrants at the time of the Legacy Pear Series D funding round. The Legacy Pear Series D preferred stock warrants were exercisable for 1,012,672 shares of Legacy Pear Series D preferred stock. The Legacy Pear Series D preferred stock warrants have an exercise price of $5.51 per share and would have expired in 2030 and were exercisable at any time prior to the ten-year anniversary of the Perceptive Closing Date of the Perceptive Credit Facility. At issuance, the Company determined that the warrant is liability-classified and would be remeasured at fair value each reporting period, with changes in fair value recorded in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss. The Additional Warrants would have been issued as warrants to purchase 65,333 shares of Legacy Pear Series D-1 preferred stock. On November 30, 2021, Perceptive net exercised 1,012,672 Legacy Pear Series D warrants pursuant to which Perceptive obtained 629,057 shares of Legacy Pear Series D-1 preferred stock in a cashless exercise, and subsequently converted the 629,057 shares of Legacy Pear Series D-1 preferred stock into 629,057 shares of Legacy Pear common stock which were then converted into 926,232 shares of Class A common stock as adjusted by the exchange ratio based on a per share price of $9.87 per share, the THMA closing price on June 22, 2021. See Notes 1 and 3 for more information.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 15

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
On March 25, 2022, we amended the Perceptive Credit Facility to adjust certain covenants under the agreement. The amendment included among other things, reducing the required minimum trailing 12-month revenue for the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2022, through the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2025 as described above.
On the Perceptive Closing Date, the Company received proceeds of $28,500, net of fees and expenses of $1,500. As of September 30, 2022, no further borrowings were taken under the Perceptive Credit Facility. The outstanding balance of the Perceptive Credit Facility was:
Perceptive Credit Facility
September 30, 2022
Principal
$30,000 
Less: Debt issuance costs and discount at issuance
(2,545)
Net carrying amount
$27,455 
As discussed in Note 1, due to the substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue operating as a going concern for twelve months from the issuance date of these financial statements, the amounts due as of September 30, 2022, have been classified as current in the consolidated balance sheet. Future minimum payments, including contractual interest, under the Perceptive Credit Facility as of September 30, 2022, are as follows:
Years ended December 31,
Amounts
Remainder of 2022920 
20233,650 
202410,603 
2025
24,039 
Total
$39,212 
Less:
Interest payable
(9,212)
Unamortized debt issuance costs
(2,545)
Current portion of long-term debt
(27,455)
Long-term debt
$— 
8. LEASES
As of September 30, 2022, the Company leases office space under non-cancelable operating leases in three cities: Boston, Massachusetts, consisting of approximately 19,000 square feet that will expire on June 1, 2028, including approximately 900 square feet that the Company took over on January 1, 2022, San Francisco, California, consisting of approximately 17,000 square feet that will expire on July 31, 2025, and Raleigh, North Carolina, consisting of approximately 7,700 square feet that will expire on May 31, 2026. We have the right and option to extend each of the Boston and Raleigh leases for a five year period.
As described in Note 2, the Company adopted Topic 842, Leases, as of January 1, 2022. Prior period amounts have not been adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with our historic accounting under Topic 840. All of the Company's leases are classified as operating leases. The components of ROU assets and lease liabilities are included in the condensed consolidated balance sheets.
We recognized rent expense of $714 and $2,168 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, respectively, and $680 and $2,056 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively. The Company had $1,007 in deferred rent recorded within other long-term liabilities in the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2021.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 16

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
Future commitments under non-cancelable lease agreements are as follows:
Years ended December 31,Lease Commitments
Remainder of 2022$709 
20232,912 
20243,176 
20252,734 
2026 and thereafter3,879 
Total lease payments13,410 
   Less: present value adjustment(2,802)
Present value of total lease liabilities10,608 
   Less: current lease liability(1,890)
      Long-term operating lease liabilities$8,718 
As of December 31, 2021, prior to the adoption of ASC 842, the estimated minimum future lease payments for the next five years and thereafter was as follows:
Years ended December 31,Lease Commitments
20222,809 
20232,912 
20243,176 
20252,734 
2026 and thereafter3,879 
Total15,510 
Operating lease liabilities are based on the net present value of the remaining lease payments over the remaining lease term. In determining the present value of lease payments, the Company used its incremental borrowing rate when measuring operating lease liabilities. As of September 30, 2022, the weighted average remaining lease term is 4.62 years and the weighted average discount rate used to determine the operating lease liability is 10%.
In addition to rent, certain leases require the Company to pay additional amounts for taxes, insurance, maintenance, and other operating expenses.
9. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Licenses Related to our Commercial Products
As of September 30, 2022, the Company has four license agreements related to its commercialized products.
The Invention Science Fund I, LLC
The Company entered into a contribution and license agreement for Pharmaceutical Field of Use, or FOU, with The Invention Science Fund I, LLC, or ISF, in February 2015, as amended on February 28, 2018, or ISF Contribution and License Agreement. The ISF Contribution and License Agreement superseded an original contribution and license agreement between the Company and ISF dated December 31, 2013. Under the ISF Contribution and License Agreement, ISF granted the Company certain licenses under specified patent rights to develop and commercialize licensed products either independently and/or with a drug combination product for use in connection with the treatment of central nervous system disorders. The ISF Contribution and License Agreement contains minimum annual royalty obligations. To the extent there are sales of a licensed product, the Company is required to pay low-
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 17

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
single-digit royalties on net revenue. The Company recorded minimum annual royalty fees of $250 and $750 to ISF for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, respectively, and $250 and $750 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively.
Red 5 Group, LLC
In January 2015, the Company entered into a software license agreement with Red 5 Group, LLC, or Red 5, and in March 2018, the parties entered into an amended and restated software license agreement, or Amended Red 5 Group License. Under the original software license agreement, Red 5 licensed the Company certain technology and materials relating to the treatment of psychological and substance use disorders, pursuant to which the Company, received, inter alia, an exclusive, worldwide, sublicensable, royalty-bearing license to develop and commercialize integrated products incorporating the licensed technology and materials. The Company agreed to use commercially reasonable efforts to develop integrated products in accordance with the development plan, to introduce any integrated products that gain regulatory approval into the commercial markets, to market integrated products that have gained regulatory approval following such introduction into the market, and to make integrated products that have gained regulatory approval reasonably available to the public.
In March 2018, pursuant to the Amended Red 5 Group License, the parties expanded the scope of exclusivity of the license, increased certain specified annual license maintenance fees, and required the Company to pay Red 5 an amendment fee, which was paid in April 2018. On July 1, 2021, the parties amended the Amended Red 5 Group License to further clarify certain terms and increase the royalty rate by a de minimis amount.
To the extent achieved, the Company is obligated to pay up to an aggregate of $400 if certain milestones related to product regulatory approval and commercial sales are achieved in respect to a software/drug combination, which is not currently being pursued by the Company. To the extent there are sales of an integrated product, the Company is required to pay single-digit royalties on net revenues. The Company is entitled to certain reductions and offsets against its royalty and milestone payment obligations, including the annual license maintenance fees.
The Company pays minimum annual maintenance fees to Red 5 in connection with reSET and reSET-O. The Company recorded minimum annual maintenance fees of $63 and $188 to Red 5 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, respectively, and $63 and $188 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively.
BeHealth Solutions, LLC and University of Virginia Patent Foundation
In March 2018, the Company and BeHealth Solutions, LLC, or BeHealth, entered into an assignment, license and services agreement, or the BeHealth Agreement, as well as a consulting agreement. The BeHealth Agreement closed in June 2018 and the Company paid an up-front fee. Under the BeHealth Agreement, the Company obtained license rights to certain technology and materials relating to a therapeutic treatment for insomnia. The consulting agreement is for services to be charged on a time-and-materials basis.
During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company paid a milestone payment to BeHealth of $750 upon the FDA’s marketing authorization of Somryst, a PDT intended for use in the treatment of adults with chronic insomnia. During September 2021, a commercial milestone under the license agreement with BeHealth was achieved and the Company paid $1,000 during the year ended December 31, 2021. The milestone payments are capitalized in other long-term assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and amortized on a straight-line basis to cost of product revenue over the estimated useful life of five years.
The BeHealth Agreement continues in force until the expiration of all milestone and royalty payment obligations, unless terminated earlier in accordance with its terms. The Company could be obligated to make payments of up to an additional $26,000 in the aggregate upon achievement of various commercial milestones and a mid-to-high-single-digit royalty on net sales.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 18

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
The Company pays royalties based on net revenues of the sales of Somryst to BeHealth and the University of Virginia Patent Foundation, or UVPF. The Company recorded de minimis royalties to BeHealth and UVPF for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021.
Guarantees and Indemnifications
As permitted under Delaware law, the Company indemnifies its officers, directors and employees for certain events or occurrences that happen by reason of the relationship with, or position held at, the Company. In addition, the indemnification agreements entered into with our former board members, Messrs. Schwab and Lynch, also provide certain indemnification rights to the entities with which they are affiliated. The Company maintains director and officer liability insurance coverage that would generally enable it to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. The Company may also be subject to indemnification obligations by law with respect to the actions of its employees under certain circumstances and in certain jurisdictions. Further, the Company is a party to a variety of agreements in the ordinary course of business under which it may be obligated to indemnify third parties with respect to certain matters. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, the Company had not experienced any losses related to these indemnification obligations, and no claims were outstanding as of September 30, 2022. The Company does not expect significant claims related to these indemnification obligations and consequently concluded that the fair value of these obligations is negligible and no related accruals were recorded.
Purchase Commitment
On June 17, 2021, and later amended on August 3, 2021, the Company entered into a non-cancelable purchase obligation for a subscription to the Palantir Foundry cloud platform, including support services, updates, and related professional services with Palantir for $9,300 payable over three years, continuing through September 30, 2024. Through September 30, 2022, the Company recorded $2,983 under the terms of the agreement, $2,321 of which is included in prepaid expenses on the consolidated balance sheet as of September 30, 2022.
Assignment and License Agreement
In November 2021, the Company and Waypoint Health Innovations, LLC (“Waypoint”) entered into an Assignment Agreement and Intellectual Property License Agreement (collectively, the “Waypoint Agreement”). The Waypoint Agreement closed in December 2021, under which the Company obtained software, documentation, and other intellectual property rights relating to the therapeutic treatment of depression. At the same time, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with the Chief Executive Officer of Waypoint to provide certain services to Pear to be charged on a time-and-materials basis. The Company made an upfront payment of $1,350, and is required to make annual payments starting in the second half of 2022 of $250 per year through 2026 or until a commercial milestone payment is made under the agreement. The upfront payment and the net present value of the annual payments of $1,011 were capitalized and recorded as an intangible asset in consolidated balance sheet at closing, and are being amortized over five years. The net present value of the annual payments was recognized as a seller financing liability, and classified within accrued expenses and other current liabilities and other long-term liabilities on the balance sheet.
The Company will be obligated to pay mid-single digit royalties on net revenues of any commercialized products that incorporate the assets obtained under the Waypoint Agreement. Additionally, the Company could be obligated to make payments of up to an additional $2,500 in the aggregate upon achievement of certain regulatory and commercial milestones. Through September 30, 2022, no royalties have been paid to Waypoint.
Legal Proceedings
The Company is also involved from time to time in various legal proceedings arising in the normal course of business. Although the outcomes of potential legal proceedings are inherently difficult to predict, the Company does not expect the resolution of these occasional legal proceedings to have a material adverse effect on its financial position, results of operations, or cash flow.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 19

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
10.    REVENUE AND CONTRACT BALANCES
Contract Balances
We enter into agreements with health care providers and payors, and state and local governments, to provide prescriptions which provide for volume-based discounts and other discounts, and in certain circumstances, value-based rebates (“Access Agreements”). We also enter into arrangements with health care providers and payors that provide for government-mandated and/or privately negotiated rebates and discounts with respect to the purchase of our products. A portion of the product revenue is recognized when the products are made available to the customer (via Access Agreements) or when a prescription is fulfilled (via third party reimbursement), and the portion of the product revenue related to the clinician’s access to our proprietary clinician dashboard is deferred and recognized ratably over the remaining term of the contract (if purchased via an Access Agreement) or the prescription duration (if purchased via third party reimbursement).
The timing of revenue recognition, invoicing, and cash collections results in billed accounts receivable and unbilled receivables (contract assets) and deferred revenue (contract liabilities). We invoice our Access Agreement customers in accordance with agreed-upon contractual terms, typically at the beginning of the agreement, or at periodic intervals throughout the contract term. Invoicing may occur subsequent to revenue recognition, resulting in unbilled receivables, or in advance of services being provided, resulting in deferred revenue. Deferred revenue that will be recognized during the twelve-month period from the balance sheet date is recorded as current deferred revenue and the remaining portion is recorded as non-current deferred revenue, which is included in Other long-term liabilities in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The following table summarizes the balances of our contract assets and liabilities:
September 30, 2022December 31, 2021
Contract assets
Accounts receivables
$389 $555 
Unbilled receivables
6,794 1,239 
Contract liabilities
Deferred revenue - current482 421 
Deferred revenue - non-current22 22 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2022, the Company recognized revenue of approximately $379 that was included in deferred revenue at December 31, 2021.
Collaboration Arrangements
On March 15, 2022, the Company entered into a proof of concept agreement with SoftBank Corp., an entity under common control with SVF II Cobbler (DE) LLC, a greater than 5% shareholder of the Company, to develop a Japanese-language digital therapeutic for the treatment of sleep/wake disorders for the Japanese market. Total anticipated revenue from this agreement is between $600 and $750, and the Company anticipates fulfilling its performance obligations by the end of 2022. The Company began performing under this agreement in April 2022, and recognized approximately $361 and $615 of collaboration revenue during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, respectively.
11.    CAPITAL STOCK
The Company’s authorized capital stock consists of (a) 690,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share; and (b) 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share. As of September 30, 2022, there were 139,248,512 shares of Class A common stock issued and outstanding and 14,213,267 Warrants to purchase the Company’s Class A common stock outstanding. As of September 30, 2022, there were no shares of preferred stock issued or outstanding.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 20

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
12. STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION AND BENEFIT PLANS
The Company incurred stock-based compensation expenses of $3,563 and $9,850 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, respectively, and $930 and $1,965 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively.
Stock Incentive Plans
On December 20, 2013, Legacy Pear’s board of directors adopted the 2013 Stock Incentive Plan, or the 2013 Plan, which provided for the grant of stock options, both incentive stock options and nonqualified stock options and restricted stock, to be granted to officers, directors, consultants, and service providers. As last amended and approved by the board of directors on November 3, 2020, the Company was permitted to grant up to 16,727,451 incentive awards under the 2013 Plan.
In connection with the closing of the Business Combination, the Company adopted the 2021 Stock Option and Incentive Plan (the “2021 Plan”) a shareholder-approved plan that provides for broad-based equity grants to employees and certain non-employees, including executive officers and permits the granting of restricted stock units (“RSUs”), stock grants, performance based awards, stock options and stock appreciation rights, as well as cash bonus awards.
All stock-based awards are measured based on the grant date fair value and are generally recognized on a straight-line basis in the Company’s consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive income (loss) over the period during which the employee is required to perform services in exchange for the award (generally requiring a four-year vesting period). RSUs granted under the 2021 Plan generally vest over three years, based on continued employment, and are settled upon vesting in shares of the Company’s Class A common stock on a one-for-one basis.
As of September 30, 2022, a total of 38,891,801 shares of Class A common stock are reserved under the 2021 Plan, including a total of 32,000,000 shares initially reserved for issuance under the 2021 Plan. The 2021 Plan provides that the number of shares reserved and available for issuance under the 2021 Plan will automatically increase each January 1, beginning on January 1, 2022 and ending in 2031, by 5% of the outstanding number of Class A common stock on the immediately preceding December 31, or such lesser amount as determined by the plan administrator (the Company’s board of directors or compensation committee).
During the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, the Company granted stock options to purchase 1,016,918 and 6,000,898 shares of common stock with aggregate grant date fair values of $2,536 and $12,075, respectively.
Common Stock Options
The combined stock option activity for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, is as follows:
Stock Options
Weighted Average Exercise Price
Weighted-Average Remaining Contractual Life (years)Aggregate Intrinsic Value
Outstanding at December 31, 202119,381,975 $3.028.16
Granted
1,016,918 $4.14
Exercised
(1,412,474)$0.84
Canceled and forfeited
(2,194,341)$4.88
Outstanding at September 30, 2022
16,792,078 $3.037.54$11,532 
Exercisable at September 30, 2022
9,254,564 $1.636.65$9,019 
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 21

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
There were no stock options granted during the three months ended September 30, 2022. The fair value of stock options that vested during the nine months ended September 30, 2022, was $6,050.
As of September 30, 2022, the total unrecognized compensation costs related to non-vested stock options were approximately $19,151 and are expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 2.71 years.
Restricted Stock Units
RSUs generally vest in equal annual installments over a three year period. The grant-date fair value of the RSUs is recognized as expense on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period. The Company determines the fair value of RSUs based on the closing price of its common stock on the date of the grant.
RSU activity is as follows:
Number of SharesWeighted Average Fair Value
Outstanding as of December 31, 2021
Granted6,341,788$3.26 
Forfeited and canceled(550,480)4.06 
Outstanding as of September 30, 2022
5,791,308$3.19 
As of September 30, 2022, there was $14,684 of unrecognized compensation cost related to time-based RSUs which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.28 years.
Employee Stock Purchase Plan
In connection with the closing of the Business Combination, the Company adopted the 2021 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “2021 ESPP”). The 2021 ESPP is a shareholder-approved plan under which substantially all employees may voluntarily enroll to purchase the Company’s Class A common stock through payroll deductions at a price equal to 85% of the lower of the fair market values of the stock as of the beginning or the end of six-month offering periods. An employee’s payroll deductions under the 2021 ESPP are limited to 15% of the employee’s compensation and employees may not purchase more than $25,000 of stock during any calendar year.
As of September 30, 2022, a total of 5,400,000 shares of our Class A common stock are available for issuance under the 2021 ESPP, including 1,800,000 shares initially reserved under the 2021 ESPP. The number of Class A common stock available for issuance under the 2021 ESPP will automatically increase each January 1 of each calendar year beginning on January 1, 2022, and ending in 2031, by the lesser of 3,600,000 shares of the Company’s Class A common stock, 5% of the outstanding number of shares of Class A common stock on the immediately preceding December 31, or such lesser amount as determined by the plan administrator. As of September 30, 2022, no shares have been issued under the 2021 ESPP.
Stock Compensation Expense
The Black-Scholes option pricing model is used to estimate the fair value of the stock options and rights to acquire stock granted under the 2021 ESPP Plan. The weighted-average estimated fair values of the rights to acquire stock under the 2021 ESPP, as well as the weighted-average assumptions used in calculating the fair values the rights to
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 22

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
acquire stock under the 2021 ESPP during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, and 2021 were as follows:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
Stock Options2022202120222021
Risk-free interest rate
n/a0.87 %1.86 %0.84 %
Expected volatility
n/a71.33 %65.69 %70.89 %
Expected term (years)
n/a
5.76-6.11
5.42-6.57
5.67-6.7
Expected dividend yield
n/a— %— %— %
Fair value at grant daten/a$4.36 $2.49 $2.01 
2021 ESPP
Risk-free interest rate1.68%n/a1.68%n/a
Expected term (in years)0.50n/a0.50n/a
Expected volatility65.69%n/a65.69%n/a
Fair value at grant date$1.57n/a$1.57n/a
There were no options granted during the three months ended September 30, 2022.
The Company has classified stock-based compensation in its consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss as follows:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2022202120222021
Cost of product revenue
$64 $66 $314 $79 
Research and development
1,263 333 3,862 711 
Selling, general, and administrative
2,236 531 5,674 1,175 
Total stock-based compensation expense
$3,563 $930 $9,850 $1,965 
13. INCOME TAXES
During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, the Company recorded a full valuation allowance on federal and state deferred tax assets since management does not forecast the Company to be in a taxable position in the near future.
14. NET LOSS PER SHARE
Potentially dilutive securities have been excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share as their effects would be anti-dilutive. For periods in which the Company reports a net loss attributable to common stockholders, the weighted average number of common shares outstanding used to calculate both basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders is the same. The Company excluded the following potential common shares, presented based on amounts outstanding at period end, from the computation of
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 23

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders because including them would have had an anti-dilutive effect:
Three and Nine Months Ended September 30, 2022Three and Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
Outstanding common stock options
16,792,078 16,219,132 
Unvested restricted stock units5,791,308 — 
Warrants to purchase Legacy Pear common stock— 1,126,705 
Private placement warrants to purchase common stock5,013,333 — 
Public warrants to purchase common stock
9,199,934 — 
Earn-Out Shares12,395,625 — 
Total
49,192,278 17,345,837 
The following table summarizes the computation of basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders of the Company for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2022202120222021
Numerator:
Net loss attributable to common shareholders$(30,723)$(31,298)$(49,120)$(83,892)
Denominator:
Weighted-average common shares outstanding for basic net loss per share (1)
138,956,879 112,236,267 138,369,788 110,960,112 
Basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders (1)
$(0.22)$(0.28)$(0.35)$(0.76)
(1)     The weighted-average common shares and thus the net loss per share calculations and potentially dilutive security amounts for all periods prior to the Business Combination have been retrospectively adjusted to the equivalent number of shares outstanding immediately after the Business Combination to effect the reverse recapitalization. Historically reported weighted average shares outstanding have been multiplied by the exchange ratio of approximately 1.47. See Note 3 for further information.
15. RESTRUCTURING CHARGES
On July 25, 2022, the Company announced a restructuring of its operations and a reduction in workforce due to the macroeconomic environment. As a result of the restructuring, the Company incurred a restructuring charge of $900 associated primarily with severance and health insurance expenses related to 25 full-time employees, representing approximately 9% of full-time employee base at the time of the restructuring. The costs associated with the restructuring were recorded in the quarter ended September 30, 2022. The restructuring reduced the Company’s costs related to its pipeline candidates, discovery programs, business development, and the Company's dual platform in order to prioritize certain of its commercial efforts, and the Company will continue to reduce costs in each of these areas.
On November 14, 2022, the Company announced a second reduction in workforce further reducing our headcount by approximately 59 employees, or approximately 22% of our full-time employees as of September 30, 2022. As a result of the reduction in workforce, the Company expects to incur a charge of approximately $2,600 associated primarily with severance, employee benefits and related costs. In addition, the Company expects to record a stock-based compensation charge and corresponding payroll tax expense related to equity compensation for employees impacted by the reduction in workforce. The Company expects to record substantially all costs related to the second reduction in workforce during the quarter ended December 31, 2022 when we expect the second reduction in workforce will be substantially complete. However, the required agreements that will be executed by the
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 24

Table of Contents
Pear Therapeutics, Inc.
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
departing employees are subject to local law and consultation requirements, which could extend the process into the first quarter of 2023. Further, the charges the Company expects to incur are subject to assumptions, and actual charges may differ from the estimate disclosed above.
16. SUBSEQUENT EVENT
We have evaluated events and transactions occurring after the balance sheet date through the date of our consolidated financial statements were issued and concluded that there were no events or transactions occurring during this period that required recognition or disclosure in our consolidated financial statements, except for matters described in Note 15 related to the November 2022 workforce reduction.
* * * * * *
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 25

Table of Contents
ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements based upon current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. Pear’s actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including those set forth in the “Risk Factors” section included in Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q. All references to years, unless otherwise noted, refer to our fiscal years, which end on December 31. For purposes of this section, all references to “we,” “us,” “our,” “Pear,” or the “Company” refer to Pear Therapeutics, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries.
The following discussion and analysis should also be read in conjunction with the accompanying consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q. This Item 2 generally discusses 2022 and 2021 financial condition and results of operations and year-to-year comparisons between 2022 and 2021.
Overview
Pear is a commercial-stage healthcare company pioneering a new class of medicine, referred to as PDTs, which use software to treat disease. Our vision is to advance healthcare through the widespread use of PDTs.
Two of our FDA-authorized PDTs are for the treatment of addiction. Our first product, reSET, is indicated for the treatment of substance use disorder (“SUD”) as a monotherapy. Our second product, reSET-O, is indicated for the treatment of opioid use disorder (“OUD”) in combination with buprenorphine.
Our third product, Somryst, is indicated for the treatment of chronic insomnia.
Operating Segments
We operate our business in a single segment and as one reporting unit, which is how our chief operating decision maker (who is our president and chief executive officer) reviews financial performance and allocates resources.
Factors Affecting Our Performance and Results of Operations
We believe that our performance and future success depend on many factors that present significant opportunities for us, but also pose risks and challenges, including those discussed more fully under the heading “Risk Factors” in Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q.
Key Business Metrics
We monitor the key non-financial operating performance metrics to help us evaluate our business, identify trends affecting our business, formulate business plans, and make strategic decisions. The metrics include the following:
A.Total Prescriptions in a given period is (a) the imputed number of prescriptions based on revenue recognized under Access Agreements, plus (b) the number of prescriptions written which are not imputed under Access Agreements.
B.Fulfillment Rate in a given period is (a) the number of prescriptions for which either a patient commences therapy or there is a contractual payment obligation and revenue has been recognized divided by (b) Total Prescriptions. (Total Prescriptions times Fulfillment Rate equals Fulfilled Prescriptions.)
C.Payment Rate in a given period is (a) the number of prescriptions for which the company receives payment divided by (b) Fulfilled Prescriptions. (Fulfilled Prescriptions times Payment Rate equals Paid Prescriptions.)
D.Average Selling Price, or ASP, in a given period is the average price received by the Company per script for which the Company receives payment.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 26

Table of Contents
Key Performance Operating MetricThree Months Ended September 30, 2022Nine Months Ended September 30, 2022
Total Prescriptions 11,400+31,000+
Fulfillment Rate60%58%
Payment Rate49%48%
Average Selling Price (ASP)$1,345$1,333
Product Revenue
We generate product revenue from the sale of our three FDA-authorized PDTs: reSET, reSET-O, and Somryst. We began our efforts to self-commercialize reSET and reSET-O in Q4 2019 and Somryst in Q4 2020. Sales of our existing products are expected to reduce our net operating losses over time, but we cannot predict when we will achieve profitability.
We enter into agreements with health care providers and payors, and state and local governments, to provide prescriptions which provide for volume-based discounts and other discounts, and in certain circumstances, value-based rebates (“Access Agreements”). We also enter into arrangements with health care providers and payors that provide for government-mandated and/or privately negotiated rebates and discounts with respect to the purchase of our products. A portion of the product revenue is recognized when the products are made available to the customer (via Access Agreements) or when a prescription is fulfilled (via third party reimbursement), and the portion of the product revenue related to the clinician’s access to our proprietary clinician dashboard is deferred and recognized ratably over the remaining term of the contract (if purchased via an Access Agreement) or the prescription duration (if purchased via third party reimbursement).
Product revenue from our existing three FDA-authorized PDTs, as well as potential future product candidates, is and will be impacted by the many factors, including the following variables: patient and clinician adoption of PDTs, pricing, reimbursement, contingency management, and product mix.
Patient and Clinician Adoption of PDTs — To continue to grow our business, we will need to execute on our current business strategy of achieving and maintaining broad market acceptance of our PDTs by patients and physicians. Market acceptance and adoption of our PDTs depends on educating patients, self-insured employers, commercial and government payors, health plans and physicians, and other government entities, as to the distinct features, therapeutic benefits, cost savings, and other advantages of our PDTs as compared to competitive products or other currently available treatment options.
Pricing — In the future, assuming that we have sufficient operating capital, we expect to grow the number of commercially available PDTs in our product portfolio, offering a broad range of PDTs spanning multiple price points. PDTs may be subject to competition which may impact our pricing. In addition, our products may be subject to legislative prescription-pricing practices. Further, we continue to collect additional data to enhance product performance and bolster health economics and outcomes research (“HEOR”) and associated cost savings for payors. Our average selling price could decline over time as we engage in larger volume transactions that extend over multiple years and provide for larger volume discounts.
Reimbursement — Our payor strategy focuses across all major payor channels, including employers, Integrated Delivery Networks (“IDNs”), pharmacy benefit managers (“PBMs”), commercial payors, and government payors, including Medicaid and Medicare. We expect to increase our number of payors, and the pricing for such payors may vary as net prices for our products may be reduced by mandatory discounts or rebates required by government healthcare programs or private payors and can be subject to customary discounts and rebates. In addition, some of our products may be subject to certain customer incentive programs. Even if coverage is provided, the approved reimbursement amount may not be high enough to allow us to establish or maintain pricing sufficient to achieve profitability. In the future, as our market access team educates payors on the clinical attributes of our products, we expect our products to secure favorable coverage policies and to maximize the covered lives that have reimbursement for our products.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 27

Table of Contents
Contingency Management Costs related to clinically-validated rewards patients earn as they complete treatment goals within our reSET and reSET-O PDTs are recorded as contra revenue.
Product Mix — Sales of certain products have, or are expected to have, higher gross margins than others. As a result, our financial performance depends, in part, on the mix of products we sell during a given period.
Cost of Product Revenue
Cost of product revenue consists primarily of costs that are closely correlated or directly related to the delivery of our products, including pharmacy costs, royalties paid under license agreements related to our commercialized products, amortization of milestone payments capitalized related to commercialized products, hosting costs, and personnel-related costs, including salaries and bonuses, employee benefits, and stock-based compensation attributable to employees in a particular function and associated with our implementation services. We expect the cost of product revenue to increase as we further commercialize our products and increase the volume of prescriptions filled. However, we expect our cost of product revenue to decrease as a percentage of total revenue over the longer-term subject to the expected revenue growth.
Research and Development Expenses
As of September 30, 2022, we have multiple product candidates in our pipeline. As of July 25, 2022, we paused most investment in our pipeline in order to conserve cash, and we expect our R&D expenses will decrease during the second half of 2022 and into 2023. In addition, we anticipate that our personnel costs will decline as result of the reductions in workforce that occurred in July and November 2022.
R&D expenses consist of costs incurred in performing R&D activities, which include:
expenses incurred in connection with the development of our pipeline of PDTs;
expenses incurred to enhance our products;
costs in connection with third-party licensing agreements, including development and regulatory milestones;
personnel-related expenses, including salaries, bonuses, benefits, and stock-based compensation for employees engaged in R&D functions;
cost of clinical trials;
expenses incurred in connection with the discovery and development of our PDTs, including under agreements with third parties, such as consultants;
expenses incurred under agreements with consultants who supplement our internal capabilities, including software development;
facilities, depreciation, and other expenses, which include direct and allocated expenses, such as rent and maintenance of facilities, insurance, and other operating costs for space and costs directly related to R&D functions; and
capitalization of certain software development costs attributable to the development of our data foundry during the application development stage of the project and amortization of the costs to research and development upon completion over the expected life of the software.
Each of our product candidates has technical, clinical, regulatory, and commercial risk, including those discussed more fully under the heading “Risk Factors” in Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q.
We expense R&D costs as incurred and do not track the costs at a project level. Advance payments made for goods or services to be received in the future for use in R&D activities are recorded as prepaid expenses. The prepaid
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 28

Table of Contents
amounts are expensed as the benefits are consumed. In the early phases of development, our R&D costs are often devoted to product platform and proof-of-concept studies that are not necessarily allocable to a specific product.
Selling, General, and Administrative Expenses
Selling, general, and administrative, or SG&A, expenses consist primarily of compensation for personnel, including stock-based compensation related to commercial, marketing, executive, finance and accounting, information technology, corporate and business development, and human resource functions. Other SG&A expenses include marketing initiatives, market research and analysis, conferences and trade shows, travel expenses, professional services fees (including legal, patent, accounting, audit, tax, and consulting fees), insurance costs, amortization of internal-use software, general corporate expenses, and allocated facilities-related expenses, including rent and maintenance of facilities.
We expect SG&A expenses to decrease as we reduce spending primarily on personnel-related expenses and certain commercial efforts in connection with our restructuring activities, including the reductions in workforce that occurred in July and November 2022.
Interest and other income (expense), net
Interest expense includes interest due under our Credit Agreement with Perceptive Credit Holdings III, LP, as administrative agent for the lenders, which we refer to as the Perceptive Credit Facility, and accretion of the debt discount on the Perceptive Credit Facility as well as the change in the fair value of our derivative liabilities and earn-out liabilities that occurred during the period. We expect interest expense to increase as London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) increases. In addition, it includes the accretion of the interest of the seller financing in connection with the Waypoint asset acquired in November 2021. See Note 9 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information.
Interest income consists of interest earned on cash balances held in interest-bearing accounts. We expect our interest income will fluctuate based on rising interest rates, our cash balances on hand, the timing and ability to raise additional funds as well as the amount of expenditures for our commercial products and R&D for our product candidates and ongoing business operations.
Financial Highlights
Year-over-year product revenue grew by approximately 264% to $9.3 million from $2.6 million primarily due to an increase in sales of reSET and reSET-O under access agreements.
We incurred net losses of $49.1 million and $83.9 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, representing a period-over-period decrease of $34.8 million or 41.4%. This decrease was primarily due to a change in the fair value of the earn-out liabilities of $41.0 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022; a gain related to the change in fair value of the Public Warrants and the Private Placement Warrants of $6.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, compared to a $7.3 million loss for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, related to the Legacy Pear warrants; and a $7.2 million increase in total revenue period over period. These increases were partially offset by a $24.5 million increase in personnel-related expenses, primarily related to new hires as we expanded from an average of 213 employees for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, to an average of 293 employees for the nine months ended September 30, 2022. As of September 30, 2022, we had approximately 260 full-time employees. We had a $4.6 million increase in costs related to being a public company period over period, primarily related to our directors and officers insurance. To date, we have funded our operations primarily with proceeds from sales of Legacy Pear’s convertible preferred stock, proceeds as a result of the Business Combination, payments received in connection with collaboration and license agreements, product sales, and proceeds from borrowings under various credit facilities. Since our inception, we have received gross cash proceeds of $175.3 million as a result of the Business Combination (see Note 3 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q), and gross cash proceeds of $268.2 million from sales of our Legacy Pear’s convertible preferred stock; we currently have $30.0 million of debt outstanding under the Perceptive Credit Facility.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 29

Table of Contents
Recent Events
Restructuring and Reductions in Workforce
On July 25, 2022, the Company restructured its operations to narrow its near-term business focus and reduce its workforce due to the macroeconomic environment. As a result of the restructuring, the Company incurred a charge of $0.9 million primarily associated with the severance and health insurance expenses related to 25 full-time employees, representing approximately 9% of the the full-time employee at the time of the restructuring and reduction in workforce. The restructuring reduced the Company’s cost of the pipeline candidates, discovery programs, business development, and the Company's dual platform in order to prioritize certain of its commercial efforts and will continue to reduce costs in each of these areas. The direct costs associated with the restructuring and reduction in workforce were recorded in the quarter ended September 30, 2022.
As of July 25, 2022, in connection with this restructuring, we paused most investment in our pipeline which is discussed in detail in Part I, Item 1 of our Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 29, 2022.
On November 14, 2022, we announced a second reduction in workforce further reducing our headcount by approximately 59 employees, or approximately 22% of our full-time employees as of September 30, 2022, due to the worsening macroeconomic environment. The Company currently estimates it will incur cash charges of approximately $2.6 million in connection with the second reduction in workforce, related to severance payments, employee benefits and related costs, primarily in the fourth quarter of 2022, when it anticipates that the reduction in workforce will be substantially complete. In addition, the Company expects to record a stock-based compensation charge of between $0.3 million and $0.9 million and corresponding payroll tax expense related to modifications of equity awards for employees impacted by the reduction in workforce, subject to local law and consultation requirements, which could extend the process into the first quarter of 2023. The Company's estimate of the stock-based compensation charge and the corresponding payroll tax expense related to equity compensation for employees is subject to several assumptions, including the future price of the Company's stock at the time of the award modifications. Further, the charges the Company expects to incur are subject to assumptions, and actual charges may differ from the estimate disclosed above. In the aggregate, over the next twelve months, the reduction in force is expected to result in approximately $10.7 million in cash operating expense savings related to foregone salaries and benefits. Each affected employee’s eligibility for severance benefits is contingent upon such employee’s execution of a separation agreement, which includes a general release of claims against the Company.
We expect the July and November 2022 restructuring activities will save an aggregate of approximately $14.7 million in compensation, benefits, and related payroll taxes during the year ending December 31, 2023.
Business Combination
On December 3, 2021, (the “Closing Date”) we consummated a business combination, pursuant to the terms of the Business Combination Agreement dated June 21, 2021. Upon the consummation of the Business Combination, Oz Merger Sub, a newly formed subsidiary of THMA, merged with and into Pear, with Pear surviving. THMA was renamed Pear Therapeutics, Inc. (“Pear”) and Pear Therapeutics, Inc. was renamed Pear Therapeutics (US), Inc. (“Legacy Pear”). Legacy Pear is deemed the accounting predecessor and the post-company successor US Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) registrant, which means Legacy Pear financial statements for previous periods will be disclosed in this Form 10-Q. Future period reports filed with the SEC will include Pear Therapeutics, Inc. and its subsidiaries.
The Business Combination was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization. Under this method of accounting, THMA was treated as the acquired company for financial statement reporting purposes. The most significant change in the post-combination company’s reported financial position and results was an increase in cash of $175.0 million. We paid $32.8 million in transaction costs relating to the business combination. We recorded a liability related to the Public Warrants and the Private Placement Warrants of $16.5 million and $95.4 million related to the earn-out shares that holders of Legacy Pear common stock and Legacy Pear convertible preferred
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 30

Table of Contents
stock prior on the Closing Date who received the contingent right to receive up to 12,395,625 additional shares of Class A common stock (the “Earn-Out Shares”) upon the achievement of certain earn-out targets.
As a consequence of the Business Combination, we became the successor to an SEC-registered and Nasdaq-listed company, and we have hired additional personnel and implemented procedures and processes to address public company regulatory requirements and customary practices. We expect to incur additional annual expenses as a public company for, among other things, directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, director fees, and additional internal and external accounting and legal and administrative resources, including increased audit and legal fees over those as a private company.
Economic Conditions (Impact of COVID-19)
In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the global outbreak of COVID-19 to be a pandemic. The pandemic has significantly impacted the economic conditions in the US, as federal, state and local governments react to the public health crisis, creating significant uncertainties in the US economy. The downstream impact of various lockdown orders and related economic pullback affect our business and our customers to varying degrees. Although conditions have improved in the US in recent months, on October 13, 2022, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services extended the COVID-19 public health emergency declaration through at least January 11, 2023. We continue to closely monitor the impact of COVID-19 on all aspects of our business, including how it is impacting our customers, patients, employees, suppliers, vendors, and business partners. We are unable to predict the specific impact that COVID-19 may have on our business, financial position, and operations moving forward due to the numerous uncertainties. Any estimates made herein may change as new events occur and additional information is obtained, and actual results could differ materially from any estimates made herein under different assumptions or conditions.

For further details see the information under the heading “Risk Factors” in Part II, Item 1A in this Form 10-Q. We are unable to predict the full impact that the COVID-19 pandemic will have on our future results of operations, liquidity, and financial condition due to numerous uncertainties, including the duration of the pandemic and the actions that may be taken by government authorities across the US. The COVID-19 pandemic has also affected global access to capital and caused significant volatility in financial markets. Significant deterioration of the US and global economies or rapid increases in inflation could have an adverse impact on our future liquidity needs. As a result of the COVID -19 pandemic, we shifted our workforce to a hybrid model in which employees in one of our three offices work both remotely and onsite, and we anticipate we will continue to use this model going forward. In addition, our workforce has deep domain knowledge across a range of healthcare, technology, and general business, which was partially achieved by having certain of our employees working remotely across the US. Pear will continue to monitor the performance of its business and assess the impacts of COVID-19.
Impact of Inflation
We are experiencing rising costs for certain inflation-sensitive operating expenses such as labor and certain service providers that are heavily dependent on labor. We do not believe these impacts were material to net income during the nine months ended September 30, 2022 or will be going forward. However, significant sustained inflation driven by the macroeconomic environment or other factors could negatively impact our margins, profitability, and results of operations in future periods.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 31

Table of Contents
Results of Operations
The tables and discussion below present the results for the periods indicated:
Three Months Ended September 30,Change
(in thousands, except percentages)20222021$%
Revenues
Product revenue $3,528 $1,203 $2,325 193 %
Collaboration and license revenue 555 108 447 414 %
Total revenues 4,083 1,311 2,772 211 %
Cost and operating expenses:
Cost of product revenue 2,555 2,120 435 21 %
Research and development 10,390 9,576 814 %
Selling, general, and administrative 17,767 17,966 (199)(1)%
Total cost and operating expenses 30,712 29,662 1,050 %
Loss from operations
(26,629)(28,351)1,722 (6)%
Other expenses:
Interest and other expenses, net (647)(1,042)395 (38)%
Change in estimated fair value of earn-out liability
(2,829)— (2,829)*
Change in estimated fair value of warrant liabilities
(618)(1,905)1,287 (68)%
Total other expense(4,094)(2,947)(1,147)39 %
Net loss$(30,723)$(31,298)$575 (2)%
__________________
* Percentage change not meaningful.
Product revenue—Product revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2022 was $3.5 million, compared to $1.2 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021. The increase of $2.3 million was primarily driven by increased sales of reSET and reSET-O under Access Agreements.
Collaboration and license revenue—Collaboration and license revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2022 was $0.6 million, compared to $0.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021 primarily due to the development work completed on a Japanese-language digital therapeutic for the treatment of sleep/wake disorders for the Japanese market in collaboration with SoftBank Corp. See Item 2, “Related Party Transactions” below for information regarding the related party nature of the agreement.
Cost of product revenue—Cost of product revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2022 was $2.6 million, compared to $2.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021. This increase was primarily due to implementation costs associated with our Access Agreements and minimum royalties related to licensing agreements for commercialized products, pharmacy, and hosting costs for our PDTs. Cost of product revenue represented 62.6% and 161.7% of total revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. We expect cost of product revenue to decrease as a percentage of revenue as revenue increases.
Research and development—R&D expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2022 were $10.4 million, compared to $9.6 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021. The increase of $0.8 million was primarily due to an increase of $1.9 million of personnel-related costs as we expanded our average R&D staff from 104 for the three months ended September 30, 2021, to 124 for the three months ended September 30, 2022. We anticipate decreases in R&D costs compared to prior periods as a result of the restructuring, including the delay and cessation of certain pipeline activities and the reductions in workforce announced in July and November 2022.
Selling, general, and administrative—SG&A expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2022 were $17.8 million, compared to $18.0 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021. This decrease of $0.2 million
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 32

Table of Contents
was primarily due to a $2.3 million decrease in marketing and advertising costs, a $1.7 million decrease in other operating costs, and a $0.4 million decrease in professional fees and reduced personnel costs resulting from the restructuring and reduction in workforce announced on July 25, 2022. These decreases were partially offset by the following increases:
$2.8 million in personnel-related costs. While average headcount was consistent period over period, as a result of the severance payments made under the reduction in workforce announced in July 2022, compensation costs were higher for the three months ended September 30, 2022;
$0.6 million of public company costs, primarily related to insurance for our directors and officers; and
$0.4 million of depreciation and amortization expense, primarily related to amortization of software used in our patient support center.
We anticipate further decreases in the future in compensation and other operating costs compared to prior periods as a result of the restructuring and reductions in workforce announced in July and November 2022.
Interest and other (expense) income, net—Interest and other income (expense), net, was an expense of $0.6 million for the three months ended September 30, 2022, compared to an expense of $1.0 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021. This decrease is mainly the result of increased interest income on cash equivalents and short-term investments of $0.4 million during the three months ended September 30, 2022.
Change in fair value of earn-out liabilities—For the three months ended September 30, 2022 we recognized a $2.8 million loss as a result of the change in fair value of earn-out liabilities.
Change in fair value of warrant liabilities—We recognized a $1.9 million loss for the three months ended September 30, 2021 related to the Legacy Pear warrants, which were exercised in 2021 prior to the Business Combination. For the three months ended September 30, 2022, we recognized a loss of $0.6 million related to outstanding the Public Warrants and the Private Placement Warrants.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 33

Table of Contents

Nine Months Ended September 30,
Change
(in thousands, except percentages)
2022
2021
$%
Revenues
Product revenue $9,274 $2,550 $6,724 264 %
Collaboration and license revenue 855 338 517 153 %
Total revenues 10,129 2,888 7,241 251 %
Cost and operating expenses:
Cost of product revenue 6,437 3,585 2,852 80 %
Research and development 36,370 24,943 11,427 46 %
Selling, general, and administrative 61,512 45,811 15,701 34 %
Total cost and operating expenses 104,319 74,339 29,980 40 %
Loss from operations
(94,190)(71,451)(22,739)32 %
Other income (expenses):
Interest and other expenses, net (2,006)(3,086)1,080 (35)%
Change in estimated fair value of earn-out liability
40,961 — 40,961 *
Change in estimated fair value of warrant liabilities
6,115 (7,302)13,417 *
Loss on issuance of Legacy Pear convertible preferred stock
— (2,053)2,053 (100)%
Total other income (expense) 45,070 (12,441)57,511 *
Net loss $(49,120)$(83,892)$34,772 (41)%
__________________
* Percentage change not meaningful.
Product revenue—Product revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, was $9.3 million, compared to $2.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021. The increase of $6.7 million was primarily driven by increased sales of reSET and reSET-O under Access Agreements.
Collaboration and license revenue—Collaboration and license revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 was $0.9 million, compared to $0.3 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 primarily due to the development work completed on a Japanese-language digital therapeutic for the treatment of sleep/wake disorders for the Japanese market in collaboration with SoftBank Corp. See Item 2, “Related Party Transactions” below for information regarding the related party nature of the agreement.
Cost of product revenue—Cost of product revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, was $6.4 million, compared to $3.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021. This increase of $2.9 million was primarily due to implementation costs associated with our Access Agreements and minimum royalties related to licensing agreements for commercialized products, pharmacy, and hosting costs for our PDTs. Cost of product revenue represented 63.6% and 124.1% of total revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. We expect cost of product revenue to decrease as a percentage of revenue as revenue increases.
Research and development—R&D expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 were $36.4 million, compared to $24.9 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021. The increase of $11.4 million was primarily due to an increase of $10.0 million of personnel-related costs as we continued shifting our software development work from external to internal resources, and coinciding with an increase in average R&D headcount from 93 for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, to 132 for the nine months ended September 30, 2022. We anticipate decreases in R&D costs compared to prior periods as a result of the restructuring and reductions in workforce announced in July and November of 2022.
Selling, general, and administrative—SG&A expenses were $61.5 million and $45.8 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The increase of $15.7 million was primarily due to:
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 34

Table of Contents
$11.8 million in personnel-related costs as a result of an increase in average headcount from 111 for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, to 139 for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, primarily in the commercial team as we expand our commercial footprint;
$4.6 million of public company costs, including certain professional fees and insurance for our directors and officers;
$0.7 million of travel costs associated with increased business activity and our growing customer base; and
$1.3 million of depreciation and amortization expense, primarily related to amortization of software used in our patient support center.
These increases were offset by a decrease of $2.6 million in other operating expenses as a result of cost saving initiatives. We anticipate further decreases in employee related costs compared to prior periods as a result of the reductions in workforce, exclusive of the costs associated for the reduction in workforce that are expected to be included in the quarter ended December 31, 2022.
Interest and other (expense) income, net—Interest and other income (expense), net, for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 was an expense of $2.0 million compared to an expense of $3.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021. This decrease is mainly the result of $0.7 million of interest income on cash equivalents and short-term investments and a $0.7 million gain from the change in the fair value of the embedded debt derivative recorded during nine months ended September 30, 2022.
Change in fair value of earn-out liabilities—For the nine months ended September 30, 2022, we recognized a $41.0 million gain as a result of the change in fair value of the earn-out liabilities.
Change in fair value of warrant liabilities—We recognized a $7.3 million loss for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 related to the Legacy Pear Warrants, which were exercised in 2021 prior to the Business Combination. For the nine months ended September 30, 2022, we recognized a gain of $6.1 million related to the Public Warrants and the Private Placement Warrants.
Loss on issuance of Legacy Pear convertible preferred stock—In February 2021, we issued shares of Legacy Pear Series D-1 Preferred Stock. The shares were recorded at their estimated fair market value on the date of issuance. In connection with the Legacy Pear Series D-1 Preferred Stock, we recorded a loss of $2.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, which represents the amount by which the estimated fair value of the shares exceeded the sale price, net of issuance costs.
Income tax—We did not incur income tax expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021. Given our lack of prior earnings history, we have a full valuation allowance primarily related to our net operating loss and R&D credit carryforwards that we do not consider more likely than not to be realized.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Since our inception, our primary sources of capital have been proceeds from sales of Legacy Pear convertible preferred stock, payments received in connection with collaboration agreements, proceeds from borrowings under various credit facilities, and the Business Combination. See Note 3 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information.
We have three commercial products: reSET, reSET-O, and Somryst. The revenue from the sale of these products at the present time is not sufficient to cover the operating costs incurred. Our ability to achieve sufficient revenue to cover our costs is highly dependent on our PDTs achieving and maintaining broad market acceptance by patients and physicians and obtaining reimbursement from third-party payors. We have incurred recurring losses from inception and anticipate net losses and negative operating cash flows for the near future. For the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, we incurred net operating losses of $49.1 million and $83.9 million, respectively.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 35

Table of Contents
As of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, we had an accumulated deficit of $297.1 million and $248.0 million, respectively. As of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, we had outstanding debt of $27.5 million and $27.0 million, net of debt issuance costs, respectively. Our cash flows may fluctuate and are difficult to forecast and will depend on many factors. As of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, we had cash and cash equivalents of $59.7 million and $169.6 million, respectively.
Our primary uses of capital are, and we expect will continue to be for the near future, funding operating activities. We have in the past and we expect in the future to capitalize labor costs related to the development of our internal-use software.
In the future, we will need to raise additional capital to pursue our growth strategy and support continuing operations. Until such time as we can generate significant revenue to fund operations, we expect to seek additional capital from the issuance of equity, debt, or other capital transactions. If sufficient funds on acceptable terms are not available when needed, we will be required to significantly reduce our operating expenses further by a significant amount. On July 25, 2022, we restructured our business operations to narrow our near-term business focus and decreased our workforce to reduce our operating expenses. We announced a further reduction in workforce on November 14, 2022. We may be unable to increase our revenue, raise additional funds, or enter into such other agreements or arrangements when needed on favorable terms, or at all. Despite our recent restructuring, if we fail to raise capital or enter into such agreements as and when needed, we may have to significantly delay, further scale back or discontinue the development and commercialization of more of our product candidates and other strategic initiatives. We are also subject to various covenants related to the Perceptive Credit Facility, and given the substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, there is a risk that we may not meet our covenants in the future. As of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, we met our covenants, however we concluded that the above circumstances raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. See Note 7 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
As of September 30, 2022, we had $59.7 million of cash and cash equivalents. Our future capital requirements may vary from those currently planned and will depend on various factors, including the timing and extent of R&D spending and spending on other strategic business initiatives, including expanding our commercial operations.
Liquidity Risks
We expect to incur substantial additional expenditures in the near term to support our ongoing activities, including costs related to being a public company. We expect to continue to incur net losses for the foreseeable future. Our ability to fund our product development and clinical operations as well as commercialization of our product candidates will depend on the amount and timing of cash available to fund operations. Our future liquidity and capital funding requirements will depend on numerous factors, including:
our revenue growth;
the ability to obtain third-party payor reimbursement for our current products;
the amount and timing of sales and other revenues from our product candidates, if approved, including the sales price and the availability of coverage and adequate third-party payor reimbursement;
our commercial activities, including sales and marketing;
our R&D efforts;
the emergence and effect of competing or complementary products;
the outcome, timing, and cost of meeting regulatory requirements established by the FDA, or comparable foreign regulatory authorities;
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 36

Table of Contents
the progress, timing, scope, and costs of our preclinical studies, clinical trials, potential future clinical trials, and other related activities;
the costs of commercialization activities for any of our product candidates that receive marketing authorization, including the costs and timing of establishing product sales, marketing and hosting capabilities, or entering into strategic collaborations with third parties to leverage or access these capabilities;
the cash requirements of developing our programs and our ability and willingness to finance their continued development;
the cash requirements of any future discovery of product candidates;
our ability to retain our current employees;
the time and cost necessary to respond to technological and market developments, including other products that may compete with one or more of our product candidates;
debt service requirements;
the extent to which we acquire or invest in business, products, or technology;
our ability to reduce or contain certain costs and expenses;
the impact of the macroeconomic environment; and
the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
A change in the outcome of any of these or other variables with respect to the development of any of our product candidates could significantly change the costs and timing associated with the sale of our products or the development of product candidates. Further, our operating plans may change in the future, and we may need additional funds to meet operational needs and capital requirements associated with such operating plans. See the information under the heading “Risk Factors” included in Part II, Item 1A this Form 10-Q for risks related to our financial condition.
Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with the development and commercialization of our product candidates, we are unable to estimate the amounts of increased capital outlays and operating expenditures associated with our current and anticipated product development programs.
Funding Requirements
Please see the risks associated with our substantial capital requirements explained more fully under the heading “Risk Factors-We will need substantial additional funding, and if we are unable to raise capital when needed or on terms favorable to us, our business, financial condition, and results of operation could be materially and adversely affected in Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q.
Debt Financing and Covenants
Borrowings under our secured Perceptive Credit Facility were $30.0 million as of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021; these borrowings were used to extinguish the former SVB Term Loan and for general business purposes. The Perceptive Credit Facility matures in June 2025. We are required to pay a variable rate of interest based upon the one-month LIBOR rate plus 11.0%, subject to a LIBOR floor of 1.0%. As of September 30, 2022, the annual interest rate was 13.6%. The Company is required to make interest-only payments until May 31, 2024, after which point the Company will be required to make monthly payments of principal equal to 3.0% of the then outstanding principal until maturity on June 30, 2025.
The Perceptive Credit Facility is secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company, including our intellectual property. The Perceptive Credit Facility requires the Company to (i) maintain a minimum aggregate cash balance of $5.0 million in one or more controlled accounts, and (ii) as of the last day of each fiscal quarter commencing with
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 37

Table of Contents
the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2022, report revenues for the trailing 12-month period that exceed the amounts that range from $5.8 million for the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2022, to $125.0 million for the fiscal quarter ending March 31, 2025. For the quarter ending December 31, 2022, the trailing 12-month period revenue requirement is $18 million. The Perceptive Credit Facility contains various affirmative and negative covenants that limit the Company’s ability to engage in specified types of transactions. The Company was in compliance with the covenants under the Perceptive Credit Agreement as of September 30, 2022.
See Note 7 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information. In the future, we may seek to obtain other additional sources of financing, including incurring term debt or issuing equity or debt securities.
As of September 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, we had $0.4 million in a letter of credit outstanding in connection with our leased property in San Francisco, California.
Contractual Obligations, Commitments, and Contingencies
We lease our headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts, under a non-cancelable operating lease with an expiration date of June 1, 2028. We also lease office space in San Francisco, California, under a non-cancelable operating lease that expires on July 31, 2025, and office space in Raleigh, North Carolina, under a non-cancelable operating lease that expires on May 31, 2026. See Note 8 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information.
We enter into agreements in the normal course of business with various vendors, which are generally cancellable upon notice. Payments due upon cancellation consist only of payments for services provided or expenses incurred, including non-cancellable obligations of service providers, up to the date of cancellation.
In addition, under various licensing agreements to which we are a party, we are obligated to pay annual license maintenance fees and may be required to make milestone payments and to pay royalties and other amounts to third parties. The payment obligations under these agreements are contingent upon future events, such as our achievement of specified milestones or generating product revenue, and the amount, timing and likelihood of such payments are not known. Amounts related to contingent milestone payments are not considered contractual obligations as they are contingent on the successful achievement of certain milestones. These contingent milestones may not be achieved. We cannot estimate or predict when, or if, these amounts will become due. See Note 9 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information.
On June 17, 2021, and as amended on August 3, 2021, we entered into a non-cancelable purchase obligation for a subscription to the Palantir Foundry cloud platform, including support services, updates, and related professional services with Palantir for $9.3 million payable over three years, we have paid $3.0 million and the remaining $6.3 million is due in quarterly installments starting on October 1, 2022 continuing through September 30, 2024.
See Note 9 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information.
Director and Officer Indemnification
We have entered into indemnification agreements with our directors and certain officers and employees that will require us, among other things, to indemnify them against certain liabilities that may arise by reason of their status or service as directors, officers, or employees. No demands have been made upon us to provide indemnification under such agreements and there are no claims that we are aware of that could have a material effect on our condensed consolidated balance sheets, condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss, condensed consolidated statements of stockholders' equity, or condensed consolidated statements of cash flows.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 38

Table of Contents
Cash Flows
The following table provides a summary of cash flow data for each applicable period:
Nine Months Ended September 30,
(in thousands)
2022
2021
Net cash used in operating activities$(89,615)$(69,199)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities(21,387)4,636 
Net cash provided by financing activities1,194 16,101 
Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash$(109,808)$(48,462)
Operating Activities
Net cash used in operating activities was $89.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022. Net cash used in operating activities consists of a net loss of $49.1 million, adjusted for non-cash items and the effect of changes in working capital. Non-cash adjustments primarily include the change in fair value of earn-out liabilities of $41.0 million, the change in fair value of warrant liabilities of $6.1 million, and net increases in operating assets and liabilities (working capital) of $7.2 million, partially offset by stock-based compensation of $9.9 million,
Net cash used in operating activities was $69.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021. Net cash used in operating activities consists of a net loss of $83.9 million, adjusted for non-cash items and the effect of changes in working capital. Non-cash adjustments that offset the net loss for the period primarily include the change in fair value of Legacy Pear warrants of $7.3 million, a loss on the issuance of convertible preferred stock of Legacy Pear of $2.1 million, and stock-based compensation expense of $2.0 million.
Investing Activities
Net cash used in investing activities was $21.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2022, and related primarily to the purchase of investments of $66.0 million offset by proceeds from the maturity and sale of investments of $47.0 million.
Net cash provided by investing activities was $4.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, and related primarily to maturities and sales of investments of $15.0 million offset by purchases of investments of $8.0 million.
Financing Activities
Through September 30, 2022, Pear has financed its operations primarily through the Business Combination, the sale of Legacy Pear convertible preferred stock, payments received in connection with collaboration agreements, payments received from product sales, and borrowings under various credit facilities.
Net cash provided by financing activities was $1.2 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2022, and related to proceeds from the exercise of stock options.
Net cash provided by financing activities was $16.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, and related to net proceeds from the issuance of Legacy Pear Series D convertible preferred stock of $19.9 million and proceeds of $0.8 million from the exercise of stock options, partially offset by the payment of deferred offering costs of $4.6 million.
Related Party Transactions
Effective March 15, 2022, we entered into a development agreement with SoftBank Corp., an entity under common control with SVF II Cobbler (DE) LLC (a greater than 5% shareholder of Pear), to develop a Japanese-language digital therapeutic for the treatment of sleep/wake disorders for the Japanese market. See Note 10 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for further information.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 39

Table of Contents
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
Refer to the accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements as of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, included in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q for more information regarding recently issued accounting pronouncements, the timing of their adoption, and its assessment, to the extent it has made one, of their potential impact on its financial condition and results of operations.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
The preparation of our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with US generally accepted accounting principles, or US GAAP, and the Company’s discussion and analysis of its financial condition and operating results require the Company’s management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported. Management bases these estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that it believes are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities. Actual results may differ materially from these estimates if past experience or other assumptions do not turn out to be substantially accurate.
The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We monitor our estimates on an ongoing basis for changes in facts and circumstances, and material changes in these estimates could occur in the future. Changes in estimates are recorded in the period in which they become known.
Our critical accounting policies are those policies which require the most significant judgments and estimates in the preparation of our condensed consolidated financial statements. We have determined that our most critical accounting policies are those relating to Legacy Pear convertible preferred and Legacy Pear common stock valuations, revenue recognition, valuation of earn-out liabilities, and stock-based compensation. There have been no significant changes to our existing critical accounting policies and significant accounting policies discussed in the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021.
ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
As a “smaller reporting company,” we are not required to provide this information.
ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Background and Remediation of Material Weakness
As discussed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021, we identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting in our evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures covering our consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2021. We have concluded that material weaknesses exist in our evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures, including internal control over financial reporting, as we do not have the necessary business processes, personnel and related internal controls to operate in a manner to satisfy the accounting and financial reporting requirements of a public company. These material weaknesses primarily manifested in improper segregation of duties, inadequate design, implementation, and maintenance of adequate information systems controls, including access and change management controls and timely recording of material transactions prior to being a public company.
We are focused on designing and implementing effective internal controls and measures to improve our evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures, including internal control over financial reporting, and remediate the material weaknesses. In order to remediate these material weaknesses, we have taken and plan to take the following actions:
the hiring and continued hiring of additional accounting staff with public company experience with the required skills; including a VP, Corporate Controller, and staff with adequate US GAAP and SEC reporting
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 40

Table of Contents
experience to address complex US GAAP technical accounting issues and to prepare and review the financial statements and related disclosures in accordance with US GAAP and SEC financial reporting requirements,
implemented a new enterprise resource planning system to replace the prior general ledger package,
implementation of the maintenance of adequate information systems controls, including access and change management controls,
implemented new internal controls and procedures for the purpose of addressing the standards and requirements applicable to public companies, including additional review controls and processes requiring timely account reconciliation and analyses of certain transactions and accounts,
implemented an integrated, collaborative cloud-based audit platform application, and
hired a national accounting firm to assist in the design and implementation of controls and remediation of control gaps.
These actions and planned actions are subject to ongoing evaluation by management and will require testing and validation of the design and operating effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting over future periods. We are committed to the continuous improvement of our internal control over financial reporting and will continue to review the internal controls over financial reporting.
Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act") is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in company reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
As required by Rules 13a-15 and 15d-15 under the Exchange Act, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of September 30, 2022. Based upon their evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) were not effective.

Limitations on Effectiveness of Internal Controls
Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and implemented, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Due to the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues, errors and instances of fraud, if any, within the company have been or will be detected.
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
We continuously seek to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of our internal controls. This results in refinements to processes throughout our Company.
Except for the remediation efforts described above, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during the quarter ended September 30, 2022 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 41

Table of Contents
Limitations of Effectiveness of Controls and Procedures
In designing and evaluating our disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.

Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 42

Table of Contents
PART II
ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are not currently subject to any material legal proceedings, nor, to our knowledge, is any material legal proceeding threatened against us or any of our officers or directors in their corporate capacity. From time to time, we may become involved in litigation or legal proceedings relating to claims arising from the ordinary course of business. Although the outcomes of these legal proceedings are inherently difficult to predict, we do not expect the resolution of these proceedings to have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations, or cash flow.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 43

Table of Contents
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
Summary of Risk Factors
Below is a summary of the principal factors that make an investment in our Class A common stock speculative or risky. This summary does not address all of the risks that we face. Additional discussion of the risks summarized in this risk factor summary, and other risks that we face, can be found below under the heading “Risk Factors” and should be carefully considered, together with other information in this Form 10-Q and our other filings with the SEC before making an investment decision regarding our Class A common stock.

Risks relating to our business and industry include:
• The failure of our prescription digital therapeutics to achieve and maintain market acceptance and adoption by patients and physicians would cause our business, financial condition and results of operations to be materially and adversely affected.
• The insurance coverage and reimbursement status of novel products, such as prescription digital therapeutics, is uncertain and only a limited number of healthcare insurers have agreed to reimburse purchases of our products. Failure to obtain or maintain adequate coverage and reimbursement for our products would substantially impair our ability to generate revenue.
• The market for prescription digital therapeutics is new, rapidly evolving, and increasingly competitive, as the healthcare industry in the US is undergoing significant structural change.
•    Our products and product candidates are novel and negative perception of any of our products or product candidates could adversely affect our ability to conduct our business, obtain marketing authorizations, or identify alternative regulatory pathways to market for such product candidates.
• Our future depends on the continued contributions of our senior management team and our ability to attract and retain other highly qualified personnel; in particular, Corey McCann, our President and Chief Executive Officer, and Christopher Guiffre, our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer.
• We rely significantly upon Access Agreements from third-parties for the sale of our products and, if the opportunities for Access Agreements decline, such reliance could adversely affect our results.
Our products are made available via the Apple Store and the Google Play Store and supported by third-party infrastructure. If our ability to access those markets or access necessary third-party infrastructure was stopped or otherwise restricted, it would materially and adversely affect our business.
• We face significant competition and new products may emerge that provide different or better alternatives for treatment of the conditions that our products are authorized to treat. Many of our current and future competitors have or will have significantly more resources.
Risks relating to our financial position include:
• We will need substantial additional funding, and if we are unable to raise capital when needed or on terms favorable to us, our business, financial condition, and results of operation could be materially and adversely affected.
• We may not fully realize the expected cost savings and/or operating efficiencies from our restructuring activities.
We have a history of significant losses, anticipate increasing expenses in the future, and may not be able to achieve or maintain profitability.
Our credit agreement with Perceptive restricts our current and future operations, particularly our ability to respond to changes or to take certain actions.
• Due to limited resources we have to prioritize the development of certain product candidates over others.
Risks relating to our intellectual property and technology include:
• Limitations on our ability to maintain or obtain patent protection and/or the patent rights relating to our products and product candidates may limit our ability to prevent third parties from competing against us.
• We in-license patents and content from third parties to develop our products and product candidates. If we had a dispute or fail to comply with obligations in the agreements with a third-party licensor, we could
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 44

Table of Contents
lose rights that are important to our business, or it could materially and adversely affect our ability to commercialize the product or product candidate affected by the dispute.
Risks relating to our products include:
• The success of our products or any new products depends on several factors, including regulatory review timelines, timely completion, competitive pricing, adequate quality testing, integration with new and existing technologies in our products and third-party collaborators’ technologies and overall market acceptance.
Risks relating to our regulatory compliance and legal matters include:
• We operate in a highly regulated industry and are subject to a wide range of federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations, including US Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) regulatory requirements and laws pertaining to fraud and abuse in healthcare, that affect nearly all aspects of our operations. Failure to comply with these laws, rules and regulations, or to obtain and maintain required licenses, could subject Pear to enforcement actions, including substantial civil and criminal penalties, and might require Pear to recall or withdraw a product from the market or cease operations. Any of the foregoing could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
• Security breaches, ransomware attacks and other disruptions to our information technology structure could compromise our information, disrupt our business and expose us to significant liability, which would cause our business and reputation to suffer, and we may be unable to maintain and scale our technology.
• The regulatory framework for digital health products is constantly evolving. Increasingly stringent regulatory requirements could create barriers to our development and introduction of new products. Conversely, in the event that regulatory requirements are lowered, competitors could potentially enter the prescription digital therapeutic market and compete against us more easily. Either of the foregoing could materially harm our business.
Risks relating to our financial reporting include:
As a public reporting company, we will be subject to rules and regulations established from time to time by the SEC regarding our internal control over financial reporting. If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud. As a result, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy of our financial reports, which would harm our business and the trading price of our Class A common stock. Our management is required to evaluate the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.
• Our management has identified certain internal control deficiencies that constitute material weaknesses. If we fail to maintain an effective system of disclosure controls and internal control over financial reporting, our ability to produce timely and accurate financial statements or comply with applicable regulations could be impaired.
Risks relating to ownership of our Class A common stock and Warrants:
• The exercise of Warrants for our stock would increase the number of shares eligible for future resale in the public market and result in dilution to our stockholders. Such dilution will increase if more of our shares are redeemed.
• We may redeem unexpired Warrants prior to their exercise at a time that is disadvantageous to you, thereby making your Warrants worthless.
• Future resales of the Class A common stock may cause the market price of our securities to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 45

Table of Contents
Risk Factors
You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below, together with the information included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and other documents we file with the SEC. The risks and uncertainties described below are those that we have identified as material, but are not the only risks and uncertainties facing us. Our business is also subject to general risks and uncertainties that affect many other companies, such as overall US and non-US economic and industry conditions including a global economic slowdown, geopolitical events, changes in laws or accounting rules, fluctuations in interest and exchange rates, terrorism, international conflicts, major health concerns, natural disasters or other disruptions of expected economic and business conditions. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial also may impair our business operations and liquidity.
This section should be read in conjunction with Part I, Item 2, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes in Part I, Item 1, Financial Statements, of this Form 10-Q.
Risks Related to Our Business and Industry
The failure of our prescription digital therapeutics to achieve and maintain market acceptance and adoption by patients and physicians would cause our business, financial condition and results of operations to be materially and adversely affected.
Our current business strategy is highly dependent on our prescription digital therapeutics, or PDTs, achieving and maintaining broad market acceptance by patients and physicians. Market acceptance and adoption of our PDTs depends on educating people with chronic conditions, as well as self-insured employers, commercial and government payors, health plans and physicians and other government entities, as to the distinct features, therapeutic benefits, cost savings, and other advantages of our PDTs as compared to competitive products or other currently available methodologies. If we are not successful in demonstrating to existing or potential patients and prescribers the benefits of our products, or if we are not able to achieve the support of patients, healthcare providers and payors for our products, our sales may decline or we may fail to increase our sales in line with our forecasts.
Achieving and maintaining market acceptance of our products could be negatively impacted by many factors, including:
the failure of reSET, reSET-O and Somryst to achieve wide acceptance among people with substance use disorder, opioid use disorder and chronic insomnia, self-insured employers, commercial and government payors, health plans, physicians and other government entities, and key opinion leaders in the treatment community;
lack of additional evidence or peer-reviewed publication of clinical or real world evidence supporting the effectiveness, safety, cost-savings or other advantages of our products over competitive products or other currently available methodologies;
perceived risks associated with the use of our products or similar products or technologies generally;
our ability to secure and maintain FDA and other regulatory clearance, authorization or approval for our products;
the introduction of competitive products and the rate of acceptance of those products as compared to our products; and
results of clinical, real world and HEOR studies relating to chronic condition products or similar competitive products.
In addition, our products may be perceived by patients and healthcare providers to be more complicated or less effective than traditional approaches, and people may be unwilling to change their current health regimens.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 46

Table of Contents
Moreover, we believe that healthcare providers tend to be slow to change their medical treatment practices because of perceived liability risks arising from the use of new products and the uncertainty of third-party reimbursement. Accordingly, healthcare providers may not recommend our products until there is sufficient evidence to convince them to alter their current approach.
The insurance coverage and reimbursement status of novel products, such as prescription digital therapeutics, is uncertain and only a limited number of healthcare insurers have agreed to reimburse purchases of our products. Failure to obtain or maintain adequate coverage and reimbursement for our products would substantially impair our ability to generate revenue.
In the US, patients generally rely on third-party payors to reimburse all or part of the costs associated with their treatment. Adequate coverage and reimbursement from governmental healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, and commercial payors is critical to the ability of patients to afford treatments and achieve new product acceptance. Our ability to successfully commercialize our products will depend in part on the extent to which coverage and adequate reimbursement for these products and related treatments will be available from government health administration authorities, private health insurers and other organizations. Government authorities and third-party payors, such as private health insurers and health maintenance organizations, decide which medications they will pay for and establish reimbursement levels. The availability of coverage and extent of reimbursement by governmental and private payors is essential for most patients to be able to afford treatments. Sales of products, and of product candidates that we may identify, will depend substantially on the extent to which the costs to users of such products will be paid by health maintenance, managed care, pharmacy benefit and similar healthcare management organizations, or reimbursed by government health administration authorities, private health coverage insurers and other third-party payors. If coverage and adequate reimbursement is not available, or is available only to limited levels, we may not be able to successfully commercialize our products. Even if coverage is provided, the approved reimbursement amount may not be high enough to allow us to establish or maintain pricing sufficient to achieve profitability.
There is also significant uncertainty related to, and there may be significant delays in obtaining, the insurance coverage and reimbursement of newly cleared, authorized, or approved products and coverage may be more limited than the purposes for which the device is cleared, authorized, or approved by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities. In the US, the principal decisions about reimbursement for new medicines or medical devices are typically made by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”), an agency within the US Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”). FDA clearance or authorization provides no assurance of coverage or reimbursement by any payor. CMS decides whether and to what extent a new medicine or medical device will be covered and reimbursed under Medicare, and private payors tend to follow CMS to a substantial degree.
Factors payors consider in determining reimbursement are based on whether the product is:
a covered benefit under its health plan;
safe, effective and medically necessary;
supported by robust clinical data from well-controlled clinical research;
appropriate for the specific patient;
cost-effective; and
neither experimental nor investigational.
Each payor determines whether or not it will provide coverage for a treatment, what amount it will pay the manufacturer for the treatment and on what tier of its formulary the treatment will be placed. The position of a treatment on a payor’s list of covered drugs, biological products, and medical devices, or formulary, generally determines the co-payment that a patient will need to make to obtain the treatment and can strongly influence the adoption of such treatment by patients and physicians. Patients who are prescribed treatments for their
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 47

Table of Contents
conditions and providers prescribing such services generally rely on third-party payors to reimburse all or part of the associated healthcare costs. Patients are unlikely to use our products unless coverage is provided and reimbursement is adequate to cover a significant portion of the cost of our products.
Moreover, eligibility for coverage and reimbursement does not imply that our products will be paid for in all cases or at a rate that covers our costs, including research, development, intellectual property, manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution expenses. Interim reimbursement levels for new products, if applicable, may also not be sufficient to cover our costs and may not be made permanent. Reimbursement rates may vary according to the use of our products and the clinical setting in which they are used, may be based on reimbursement levels already set for lower cost products and may be incorporated into existing payments for other services. Net prices for products may be reduced by mandatory discounts or rebates required by government healthcare programs or private payors, by any future laws limiting prices and by any future relaxation of laws that presently restrict imports of products from countries where they may be sold at lower prices than in the US.
Third-party payors have attempted to control costs by limiting coverage and the amount of reimbursement for particular drugs or devices. We cannot be sure that coverage and reimbursement will be available for all products that we commercialize and, if reimbursement is available, what the level of reimbursement will be. Inadequate coverage and reimbursement may impact the demand for, or the price of, any product for which we obtain marketing approval. If coverage and adequate reimbursement are not available, or are available only at limited levels, we may not be able to successfully commercialize our products.
In addition, in some foreign countries, the proposed pricing for a prescription device must be approved before it may be lawfully marketed. The requirements governing medical product pricing vary widely from country to country. For example, the European Union provides options for its Member States to restrict the range of medicinal products for which their national health insurance systems provide reimbursement and to control the prices of medicinal products for human use. To obtain reimbursement or pricing approval, some of these countries may require the completion of clinical trials that compare the cost effectiveness of a particular product candidate to currently available therapies. A Member State may approve a specific price for the medicinal products, or it may instead adopt a system of direct or indirect controls on the profitability of the company placing the medicinal product on the market. There can be no assurance that any country that has price controls or reimbursement limitations for pharmaceuticals or medical devices will allow favorable reimbursement and pricing arrangements for any of our products. Historically, products launched in the European Union do not follow price structures of the US and generally prices tend to be significantly lower. While we are not currently marketing or selling our products in any country other than the US, including the European Union or any of its Member States, in the event that we choose to do so in the future, we will need to comply with such requirements.
The market for prescription digital therapeutics is new, rapidly evolving, and increasingly competitive, as the healthcare industry in the US is undergoing significant structural change.
The market for our PDTs is new and rapidly evolving, and it is uncertain whether it will achieve and sustain high levels of demand and market adoption. Our future financial performance will depend on growth in this market and on our ability to adapt to emerging demands of our customers. It is difficult to predict the future growth rate and size of our target market. The healthcare industry in the US is undergoing significant structural change and is rapidly evolving. We believe demand for our products has been driven in large part by rapidly growing costs in the traditional healthcare system, the movement toward patient-centricity and personalized healthcare, and advances in technology. Widespread acceptance of personalized healthcare is critical to our future growth and success. A reduction in the growth of personalized healthcare could reduce the demand for our PDTs and result in a lower revenue growth rate or decreased revenue.
If our assumptions regarding these uncertainties are incorrect or change in reaction to changes in our markets, or if we do not manage or address these risks successfully, our results of operations could differ materially from our expectations, and our business could suffer.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 48

Table of Contents
Our products and product candidates are novel and negative perception of any of our products or product candidates could adversely affect our ability to conduct our business, obtain marketing authorizations or identify alternate regulatory pathways to market for such product candidates.
Our products and product candidates are considered relatively new and novel therapeutic approaches. Our success will depend upon physicians who specialize in the treatment of diseases targeted by our products and product candidates prescribing potential treatments that involve the use of our products and product candidates in lieu of, or in addition to, existing treatments with which they are more familiar and for which greater clinical data may be available. Access will also depend on consumer acceptance and adoption of products that are commercialized. In addition, responses by the US, state or foreign governments to negative public perception or ethical concerns may result in new legislation or regulations that could limit our ability to develop or commercialize any product candidates, obtain or maintain marketing authorization, identify alternate regulatory pathways to market or otherwise achieve profitability.
Negative publicity concerning our products or the PDT market as a whole, could limit market acceptance of our products and product candidates. If patients and healthcare providers have a negative perception of PDTs, then a market for our products and product candidates may not develop at all, or it may develop more slowly than we expect. Our success will depend to a substantial extent on the willingness of healthcare providers to prescribe our products, the extent to which coverage and adequate reimbursement for these products and product candidates and related treatments will be available from government health administration authorities, private health insurers and other organizations and our ability to demonstrate the value of our products and product candidates to existing and potential patients and prescribers. Similarly, negative publicity regarding patient confidentiality and privacy in the context of technology-enabled healthcare or concerns experienced by our competitors could limit market acceptance of PDTs.
Our future depends on the continued contributions of our senior management team and our ability to attract and retain other highly qualified personnel; in particular, Corey McCann, our President and Chief Executive Officer, and Christopher Guiffre, our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer.
Our success depends in large part on our ability to attract and retain high-quality management in sales, market access, product development, software engineering, marketing, operations, finance and support functions, especially in the Boston area and the San Francisco Bay area. We compete for qualified technical personnel with other life sciences and information technology companies. Competition for qualified employees is intense in our industry, particularly for software engineers, and the loss of even a few qualified employees, or an inability to attract, train, retain and motivate additional highly skilled employees required for the planned expansion of our business could harm our operating results and impair our ability to grow. The loss of one or more of our key employees, and any failure to have in place and execute an effective succession plan for key executives, could seriously harm our business.
As we continue to grow, we may be unable to continue to attract or retain the personnel we need to maintain our competitive position. To attract, train and retain key personnel, we use various measures, including competitive compensation and benefit packages (including an equity incentive program), which may require significant investment. These measures may not be enough to attract and retain the personnel we require to operate our business effectively and efficiently.
Moreover, if the perceived value of our equity awards declines, it may materially and adversely affect our ability to attract and retain key employees. If we do not maintain the necessary personnel to accomplish our business objectives, we may experience staffing constraints that materially and adversely affect our ability to support our programs and operations.
Many of our employees may receive proceeds from sales of our equity in the public markets, which may reduce their motivation to continue to work for us.
In addition, our future also depends on the continued contributions of our senior management team and other key personnel, each of whom would be difficult to replace. In particular, Corey McCann, our President and Chief Executive Officer, and Christopher Guiffre, our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer, are critical to our
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 49

Table of Contents
future vision and strategic direction. We rely on our executive team in the areas of operations, research and development, commercial, and general and administrative functions. Although we have entered into employment agreements or offer letters with our key employees, these agreements have no specific duration and constitute at-will employment, and we do not maintain key person life insurance for some of our key employees.
In addition, from time to time, there may be changes in our senior management team that may be disruptive to our business. If our senior management team, including any new hires that we may make, fails to work together effectively and to execute our plans and strategies on a timely basis, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.
We rely significantly upon Access Agreements from third-parties for the sale of our products and, if the opportunities for Access Agreements decline, such reliance could adversely affect our results.
While we anticipate reimbursement will become a more prominent portion of our overall revenue over time, we are currently reliant upon Access Agreements to generate revenue for the products we provide. Until we can consistently rely on the more conventional reimbursement pathways (e.g., those utilized by drug manufacturers), our revenue will be primarily driven by these Access Agreements.
These agreements have varying terms and generally may be revised or terminated for various reasons. Any failure to maintain existing Access Agreements or enter into new Access Agreements with less favorable terms than currently in place could have a material effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, there can be no assurance that we will be able to generate sufficient revenue from Access Agreements to become profitable.
Similarly, our revenue could be materially and disproportionately impacted by the purchasing decisions of this limited customer base. In the future, our Access Agreement customers may decide to purchase less product from us than they have in the past, may alter purchasing patterns at any time with limited notice, or may decide not to continue to purchase our products at all, any of which could cause our revenue to decline materially and materially harm our financial condition.
There can be no assurance that state or federal entities will continue to provide grants to support these Access Agreements. Any discontinuance or reduction in government or private party grants could have a significant and adverse effect on these types of agreements, and as a result could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations. Relatedly, states are beginning to receive proceeds from independent and multi-state settlement agreements with pharmaceutical companies that were involved in the distribution and sale of prescription opioids. Individual states have broad discretion for how these settlement funds may be used to prevent opioid abuse and how to distribute the funds. States are creating legislatively appointed bodies to oversee these funds (e.g., New York’s Opioid Settlement Fund, Tennessee’s Opioid Abatement Fund, Nebraska’s Opioid Recovery Fund, etc.). A state’s decision not to allocate settlement funds to Access Agreements involving our products, while allocating such funds to other opioid prevention efforts, could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.
Our products are made available via the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store and supported by third-party infrastructure. If our ability to access those markets or access necessary third-party infrastructure was stopped or otherwise restricted, it would materially and adversely affect our business.
Our PDTs are exclusively accessed through and depend on the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. Both Apple and Google have broad discretion to make changes to their operating systems or payment services or change the manner in which their mobile operating systems function and their respective terms and conditions applicable to the distribution of our PDTs and to interpret their respective terms and conditions in ways that may limit, eliminate or otherwise interfere with our products, our ability to distribute our products through their stores, our ability to update our products, including to make bug fixes or other feature updates or upgrades, the features we provide, the manner in which we market our products and our ability to access native functionality or other aspects of mobile devices. To the extent either or both of them do so, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 50

Table of Contents
There is no guarantee that the third-party infrastructure that currently support our PDTs will continue to support them or, if it does not, that other alternatives will be available. We will continue to be dependent on third-party mobile operating systems, technologies, networks and standards that we do not control, such as the Android and iOS operating systems, and any changes, bugs, technical or regulatory issues in such systems, our current relationships with carriers or future relationships with mobile manufacturers, or in their terms of service or policies that degrade our PDTs’ functionality, reduce or eliminate our ability to distribute our PDTs, limit our ability to deliver high quality PDTs, or impose fees or other charges related to delivering our offerings, could adversely affect our product usage and revenue.
We rely upon third party providers of cloud-based infrastructure to host our platform. Any disruption in the operations of these third-party providers, limitations on capacity or interference with our use could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.
Our platform’s technological infrastructure is implemented using third-party hosting services, such as Amazon Web Services. We have no control over any of these third parties, and we cannot guarantee that such third-party providers will not experience system interruptions, outages or delays, or deterioration in their performance. We need to be able to access our computational platform at any time, without interruption or degradation of performance. Our hosted platform depends on protecting the virtual cloud infrastructure hosted by third-party hosting services by maintaining our configuration, architecture, features, and interconnection specifications, as well as protecting the information stored in these virtual data centers, which is transmitted by third-party Internet service providers. We have experienced, and expect that in the future we may again experience interruptions, delays and outages in service and availability from time to time due to a variety of factors, including infrastructure changes, human or software errors, hosting disruptions and capacity constraints. Any limitation on the capacity of our third-party hosting services could adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In addition, any incident affecting our third-party hosting services’ infrastructure, which may be caused by cyber-attacks, natural disasters, fire, flood, severe storm, earthquake, power loss, telecommunications failures, terrorist or other attacks, and other disruptive events beyond our control, could negatively affect our cloud-based solutions. A prolonged service disruption affecting our cloud-based solutions could damage our reputation or otherwise harm our business. We may also incur significant costs for using alternative equipment or taking other actions in preparation for, or in reaction to, events that damage the third-party hosting services we use.
In the event that our service agreements with our third-party hosting services are terminated, or there is a lapse of service, elimination of services or features that we utilize, interruption of Internet service provider connectivity, or damage to such facilities, we could experience interruptions in access to our platform as well as significant delays and additional expense in arranging or creating new facilities and services and/or re-architecting our hosted software solutions for deployment on a different cloud infrastructure service provider, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.
We rely on a limited number of third party digital pharmacies for the fulfillment of prescriptions. This reliance increases the risk that we could have a disruption in the fulfillment of prescriptions, which could have a material and adverse effect on our reputation, business, results of operations and financial condition.
We do not currently own or operate any pharmacy, nor are we licensed to perform pharmacy fulfillment services. We rely, and expect to continue to rely, on a limited number of third parties for the fulfillment of prescriptions. This reliance increases the risk that we could have a disruption in the fulfillment of prescriptions which could delay, prevent, or impair the distribution and sale of our products.
Pharmacies are subject to state and federal laws and regulations. We do not control the standards and processes of, and will be completely dependent on, our digital pharmacies for compliance with federal and state law and regulations. If our digital pharmacies fail to maintain regulatory compliance, we may need to find alternative pharmacies with the capability to fulfill prescriptions for PDTs. In addition, we have no control over the ability of our digital pharmacies to maintain adequate quality control, quality assurance, and qualified personnel. If a regulatory authority finds deficiencies with or withdraws required pharmacy licenses in the future, we may need to find alternative pharmacies with the capability to fulfill prescriptions for PDTs, which would significantly impact our ability to fulfill, distribute, and sell our products. We may be unable to establish any agreements with other digital
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 51

Table of Contents
pharmacies or to do so on acceptable terms. Even if we are able to establish agreements with other digital pharmacies, reliance on a limited number of digital pharmacies entails additional risks, including:
the possible breach of the services agreement by the third party; and
the possible termination or nonrenewal of the agreement by the third party at a time that is costly or inconvenient for us.
There are a limited number of digital pharmacies that have the capability to distribute PDTs and that might be capable of fulfilling prescriptions for our products.
If our current digital pharmacies cannot perform as agreed, we may be required to replace such digital pharmacies. We may incur added costs and delays in identifying and qualifying any such replacements. If the agreement with any of our third-party pharmacies is terminated, if any third-party pharmacy is unable to perform in accordance with the terms of the agreement, or if the services of any third-party pharmacy is terminated for any reason, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, results of operations, and financial condition.
Our current and anticipated future dependence upon others for the fulfillment of prescriptions for our product candidates or products may adversely affect our future profit margins and our ability to distribute any products on a timely and competitive basis.
We face significant competition and new products may emerge that provide different or better alternatives for treatment of the conditions that our products are authorized to treat. Many of our current and future competitors have or will have significantly more resources.
Our ability to achieve our strategic objectives will depend, among other things, on our ability to develop and commercialize products for the treatment of chronic conditions that are effective and safe, offer distinct features, are easy-to-use, provide measurable and meaningful cost savings to payors, and are more appealing than available alternatives. Our competitors, as well as a number of other companies, within and outside the healthcare industry, are pursuing new delivery devices, delivery technologies, sensing technologies, procedures, drugs, and other therapies for the monitoring and treatment of chronic conditions. Any technological breakthroughs in monitoring, treatment or prevention could reduce the potential market for our products, which would significantly reduce our sales.
The introduction by competitors of products that are or claim to be superior to our products may create market confusion, which may make it difficult for potential customers to differentiate the benefits of our products over competitive products. In addition, the entry of new PDTs to the market which treat the same or similar chronic conditions to our products may lead some of our competitors to employ pricing strategies that could materially and adversely affect the pricing of our products. If a competitor develops a product that competes with or is perceived to be superior to our products, or if a competitor employs strategies that place downward pressure on pricing within our industry, our sales may decline significantly or may not increase in line with our forecasts, either of which would materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
While our market is in an early stage of development, it is evolving rapidly and becoming increasingly competitive, and we expect it to attract increased competition. We currently face competition from a range of companies. Our competitors include both enterprise companies who are focused on or may enter the healthcare industry, including initiatives and partnerships launched by these large companies, and from private companies that offer solutions for specific chronic conditions. We compete with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies that are developing treatments for addiction and insomnia, including Alkermes and their product Vivitrol, Orexo and their product Zubsolv, Sandoz and their product Suboxone, Braeburn and their product Brixadi, Pfizer and their product Halcion, Merck and their product Belsomra, Sunovion and their product Lunesta and Sanofi and their product Ambien. In the digital health space we compete with companies that have created non-regulated products to treat addiction and insomnia such as Dynamicare, CBT4CBT, Pzizz, Headspace, Calm, Orexo and their product Modia, and Big Health and their product Sleepio, . These and other companies, which may offer their solutions at lower prices, are continuing to develop additional products and becoming more sophisticated and effective. Competition from wellness apps, which are not authorized by the FDA but may attract consumers for other reasons, and from
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 52

Table of Contents
other parties will result in continued pricing pressures, which are likely to lead to price declines in certain product segments, which could negatively impact our sales, profitability and market share.
Our ability to compete effectively depends on our ability to distinguish our company and our solution from our competitors and their products, and includes factors such as:
FDA authorization;
effectiveness and safety;
robust and well-controlled clinical research;
long-term outcomes;
ease of use and convenience;
price;
greater name and brand recognition;
information security standards;
greater market penetration;
larger sales forces;
larger marketing budgets;
access to significantly greater financial, human, technical and other resources;
breadth, depth, and effectiveness of offerings;
FDA compliance, quality, and reliability of solutions; and
healthcare provider, government agency and insurance carrier acceptance.
Some of our competitors may have, or new competitors or alliances may emerge that have, greater name and brand recognition, greater market share, a larger customer base, more widely adopted proprietary technologies, greater marketing expertise, larger sales forces, or significantly greater resources than we do and may be able to offer solutions competitive with ours at a more attractive price than we can. Further, our current or potential competitors may be acquired by third parties with greater available resources. As a result, our competitors may be able to respond more quickly and effectively than we can to new or changing opportunities, technologies, standards or customer requirements and may have the ability to initiate or withstand substantial price competition. In addition, our competitors may in the future establish cooperative relationships with vendors of complementary products, technologies or services to increase the availability of their solutions in the marketplace. Our competitors could also be better positioned to serve certain segments of our market, which could create additional price pressure. In light of these factors, even if our products are more effective than those of our competitors, current or potential customers may accept competitive products in lieu of purchasing our products. If we are unable to successfully compete, our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
A limited number of healthcare insurers have agreed to reimburse purchases of our products, and there is no assurance that additional healthcare insurers will agree to reimburse purchases of our products in the future.
To date, a limited number of healthcare insurers have agreed to reimburse purchases of reSET, reSET-O, and Somryst. We depend upon revenue from sales of reSET, reSET-O, and Somryst, and in turn on reimbursement from third-party payors for such products. The amount that we receive in payment for our products may be materially and adversely affected by factors we do not control, including federal or state regulatory or legislative changes,
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 53

Table of Contents
and cost-containment decisions and changes in reimbursement schedules of third-party payors. Any reduction or elimination of these payments could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.
Additionally, the reimbursement process is complex and can involve lengthy delays. Also, third-party payors may reject, in whole or in part, requests for reimbursement based on determinations that certain amounts are not reimbursable under plan coverage, that services provided were not medically necessary, that additional supporting documentation is necessary, or for other reasons. Retroactive adjustments by third-party payors may be difficult or cost-prohibitive to appeal, and such changes could materially reduce the actual amount we receive. Delays and uncertainties in the reimbursement process may be out of our control and may materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.
If we are unable to expand our marketing infrastructure, we may fail to increase the usage of our products and platform to meet our forecasts.
We began commercializing our products in October 2019. As a result, we have limited experience marketing our products and engaging customers at our current scale. Our financial condition and results of operations are and will continue to be highly dependent on the ability of our marketing function to adequately promote, market, and attract customers to our products and platform in a manner that complies with applicable laws and regulations and at a cost that does not exceed our current budget allocated to marketing.
If we are unable to expand our marketing capabilities, we may not be able to effectively expand the scope of our ability to attract new customers. Relatedly, if any of our advertising platforms significantly increase their advertising fees, our ability to expand our marketing reach will be greatly impeded. Any such failure could adversely affect our reputation, revenue, and results of operations.
Failure to adequately expand our direct sales force may impede our growth.
We believe that our future growth will depend in part on the continued development of our direct sales force and its ability to obtain new customers and to manage our existing customers. Identifying and recruiting qualified personnel and training and managing a geographically dispersed sales team requires significant time, expense, and attention. It can take six months or longer before a new sales representative is fully trained and productive. Our business may be adversely affected if our efforts to expand and train our direct sales force do not generate a corresponding increase in revenue. In particular, if we are unable to hire, develop, and retain sufficient numbers of productive direct sales personnel or if new direct sales personnel are unable to achieve desired productivity levels in a reasonable period of time, sales of our services will suffer, and our growth will be impeded.
Any failure to offer high quality patient support may adversely affect our relationships with our existing and prospective patients, and in turn our business, results of operations and financial condition.
In implementing and using our products, our patients will depend on our patient support to resolve issues in a timely manner. We may be unable to respond quickly enough to accommodate short-term increases in demand for patient support. Increased patient demand for support could increase costs and adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Any failure to maintain high-quality patient support, or a market perception that we do not maintain high-quality patient support, could adversely affect patient satisfaction or the willingness of physicians to prescribe our products, and in turn our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Acquisitions and strategic alliances could distract management and expose us to financial, execution and operational risks that could have a detrimental effect on our business.
We intend to continue to pursue acquisitions or licenses of technology to, among other things, expand the number of products we provide as well as the features within those products. We cannot guarantee that we will identify suitable candidates for acquisition or licensing, that the transactions will be completed on acceptable terms, or that we will be able to integrate newly acquired or licensed technology into our existing business. The acquisition and integration of another technology would divert management attention from other business activities, including our core business. This diversion, together with other difficulties we may incur in integrating newly acquired or licensed technology, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 54

Table of Contents
results of operations. In addition, we may borrow money or issue capital stock to finance such transactions. Such borrowings might not be available on terms as favorable to us as our current borrowing terms and may increase our leverage, and the issuance of capital stock (or securities exchangeable therefore) could dilute the interests of our stockholders.
If we cannot maintain our corporate culture, we could lose the innovation, collaboration and focus on the mission that contribute to our business.
We believe that our culture has been and will continue to be a critical contributor to our success. We expect to continue to hire aggressively as we expand, and we believe our corporate culture has been crucial in our success and our ability to attract highly skilled personnel. If we do not continue to develop our corporate culture or maintain and preserve our core values as we grow and evolve both in the US and internationally, we may be unable to foster the innovation, curiosity, creativity, focus on execution, teamwork and the facilitation of critical knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing we believe we need to support our growth. Moreover, liquidity available to our employee equityholders could lead to disparities of wealth among our employees, which could adversely impact relations among employees and our culture in general. Our anticipated headcount growth and our status as a public company may result in a change to our corporate culture, which could harm our business.
The COVID-19 pandemic or any future surges, including as a result of new variants and subvariants of the virus, or a similar pandemic, epidemic, or outbreak of an infectious disease may have an adverse impact on our business, operations, and the markets and communities in which we operate.
In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. This pandemic, which has continued to spread, and the related adverse public health developments, including orders to shelter-in-place, travel restrictions, and mandated business closures, have adversely affected workforces, organizations, governments, customers, economies, and financial markets globally, leading to an economic downturn and increased market volatility. It has also disrupted the normal operations of many businesses, including ours. This outbreak, as well as intensified measures undertaken to contain the spread of COVID-19, could decrease healthcare industry spending for our products, adversely affect demand for our products, affect the ability of our sales team to travel to potential customers and the ability of our professional services teams to conduct in-person services and trainings, impact expected spending from new customers, negatively impact collections of accounts receivable, and harm our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Further, the sales cycle for a new customer of our products could lengthen, resulting in a potentially longer delay between increasing operating expenses and the generation of corresponding revenue, if any. We cannot predict with any certainty whether and to what degree the disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and reactions thereto will continue and expect to face difficulty accurately predicting our internal financial forecasts. The pandemic also resulted in a shift in our workforce to a hybrid model in which employees in one of our three offices are working both remotely and onsite, and we anticipate we will continue to use this model going forward, which can increase the risk of a cybersecurity incident. In addition, our workforce has deep domain knowledge across a range of healthcare, technology, and general business, which was partially achieved by having certain of our employees working remotely across the US, which also increases the risk of a cyber security incident. Further, we continue to shift to assist new and existing customers who may also be working remotely or under hybrid models. It is not possible for us to predict the duration or magnitude of the adverse results of the outbreak and its effects on our business, results of operations, or financial condition at this time.
The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to impact the our business going forward will be dependent on future developments such as the length and severity of the crisis, the potential resurgence of the crisis, variant strains of the virus, vaccine availability and effectiveness, future government actions in response to the crisis and the overall impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the global economy and capital markets, among many other factors, all of which remain highly uncertain and unpredictable. In addition, we are uncertain of the full effect the pandemic will have on our business for the longer term since the scope and duration of the pandemic is unknown, and evolving factors such as the level and timing of the distribution of efficacious vaccines across the world and the extent of any resurgences of the virus or emergence of new variants of the virus will impact the stability of economic recovery and growth. This unpredictability could limit our ability to respond to future
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 55

Table of Contents
developments quickly. Additionally, the impacts described above and other impacts of a global pandemic, including the COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it, could substantially increase the risk to Pear from the other risks described herein.
Changes in funding or disruption at the FDA, the SEC and other government agencies caused by funding shortages or global health concerns could hinder their ability to hire and retain key leadership and other personnel, or otherwise prevent new or modified products from being developed, reviewed or commercialized in a timely manner or at all, or otherwise prevent those agencies from performing normal business functions on which the operation of our business may rely, which could negatively impact our business.
The ability of the FDA to review and grant marketing authorization for new products can be affected by a variety of factors, including government budget and funding levels, ability to hire and retain key personnel and accept the payment of user fees, and statutory, regulatory and policy changes and other events that may otherwise affect the FDA’s ability to perform routine functions. Average review times at FDA have fluctuated in recent years as a result. In addition, government funding of the SEC and other government agencies on which our operations may rely, including those that fund research and development activities is subject to the political process, which is inherently fluid and unpredictable.
Disruptions at the FDA and other agencies, may also slow the time necessary for new digital therapeutics to be reviewed and/or granted marketing authorization by necessary government agencies, which would adversely affect our business. For example, in recent years, including for 35 days beginning on December 22, 2018, the US government shut down several times and certain regulatory agencies, such as the FDA and the SEC, had to furlough critical employees and stop critical activities.
If a prolonged government shutdown occurs, or if global health concerns continue to prevent the FDA or other regulatory authorities from conducting their regular inspections, reviews or other regulatory activities, it could significantly impact the ability of the FDA to timely review and process our regulatory submissions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Future government shutdowns or delays could impact our ability to access the public markets and obtain necessary capital in order to properly capitalize and continue our operations.
Risks Related to Our Financial Position
We will need substantial additional funding, and if we are unable to raise capital when needed or on terms favorable to us, our business, financial condition, and results of operation could be materially and adversely affected.
We have consumed substantial amounts of capital to date, and we expect to incur net losses over the next several years as we continue to develop our business, market our products, and make investments in our human capital in order to grow our business. We expect to continue to spend substantial amounts to complete our currently planned clinical trials and future clinical trials, to achieve and maintain market acceptance by physicians and patients, expand our marketing channels and operations, grow our US commercial sales force, grow and enhance our platform offering of products, and make the necessary investments in human capital to scale our business. Other unanticipated costs may arise in the course of our development efforts. If we are able to gain marketing clearance, authorization, or approval for additional product candidates, we will require significant additional amounts of funding in order to launch and commercialize such additional product candidates. We cannot reasonably estimate the actual amounts necessary to successfully complete the development and commercialization of any product candidate we develop and may need substantial additional funding in the future to complete the development and commercialization of our existing and any future product candidates. Our future need for additional funding depends on many factors, including:
the scope, progress, results, and costs of researching and developing our current product candidates, as well as other additional product candidates we may develop and pursue in the future;
the timing of, and the costs involved in, obtaining marketing clearance, authorization, or approvals for our product candidates and any other additional product candidates we may develop and pursue in the future;
Pear Therapeutics, Inc. | Form 10-Q |Page 56

Table of Contents
the number of future product candidates that we may pursue and their development requirements;
the costs of commercialization activities for our product candidates, including the costs and timing of establishing product sales, marketing, and distribution capabilities;
revenue received from commercial sales of our current products and, subject to receipt of regulatory clearance, authorization, or approval, revenue, if any, received from commercial sales of our product candidates;
the extent to which our in-licenses or acquires rights to other products, product candidates, or technologies;
our investment in our human capital required to grow the business and the associated costs as we expand our research and development, and establish a commercial infrastructure;
the costs of preparing, filing, and prosecuting patent applications, maintaining, and protecting our intellectual property rights, including enforcing and defending intellectual property-related claims; and
the costs of operating as a public company.
We cannot be certain that additional funding will be available on acceptable terms, or at all. Our ability to obtain such funding could be adversely affected by a number of factors, including general conditions in the global economy and in the global financial markets, including recent volatility and disruptions in the capital and credit markets, inflation, and interest rate changes. If we are unable to raise additional capital in sufficient amounts or on terms acceptable to us, we may have to significantly delay, reduce, or terminate our product development programs or plans for commercialization. Further, if we raise additional capital in the form of capital stock (or securities exchangeable therefore), such issuances could dilute the interests of our stockholders.
As of September 30, 2022, we had cash and cash equivalents totaling $59.7 million, and there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a growing concern. We do not currently have any commitments for future funding or additional capital. If we are unable to raise additional capital in sufficient amounts or on terms acceptable to us, we may have to significantly delay, scale back, or discontinue the development or commercialization of our products or future product candidates or other research and development initiatives or commercial activities. We may need to seek collaborators for our products and any future product candidates at an earlier stage than otherwise would be desirable or on terms that are less favorable than might otherwise be available or relinquish or license on unfavorable terms our rights to our products and any future product candidates in markets where we otherwise would seek to pursue development or commercialization ourselves. Any of the above events could significantly harm our business, prospects, financial condition, and results of operations and cause the price of our common stock to decline.
Our estimates may prove to be wrong, and we could use our available capital resources sooner than expected. Further, changing circumstances, some of which are beyond our control, could cause us to consume capital significantly faster than anticipated, and we may need to seek additional funds sooner than planned. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, we may not